Intel Now Selling Scratch Coupons To Improve CPU Performance

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Links of London

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atruebond

I am not surprised at this move from Intel, and no one else should either.  Look at both AMD and Intel here.  What do you think a Tri-core proc is???  A failed quad.  Those who bought it, purchased broken crap to begin with.  Don't think of this as a car that can only go 30MPH unless you buy the upgrade, that is a terrible comparison.  Can't name all of the bolt on addons you can get for cars, so don't go there.  Hello?  What do you think Intel's extreme edition chips are?  You pay a premium for the ability of an unlocked multiplier AND nothing ELSE.

Now, does that mean I am for it?  Not really.  It is a gimmick.  It IS a great way to produce a single line of chips that can be turned off due to customer demand.  Think of it this way, I produce 3 different widgets.  They all look the same, and the build process is the same.  If I can make the same product, and turn off certain features, charging extra if you want them, that means lower production costs for me. (hopefully those profits turn into lower product cost as well.... wishful thinking)  Anytime you can reduce your product line and not affect customer service, I say do it.

One last example for all you other suckers out there... what do you think a Celeron or a Sempron is?  Re-badged old technology, and people still buy it.  Only time I hear them complain is 6 months after their purchase when it is dog-@ssd slow.  Guess what their next proc in their computer will be? A Pentium Dual core???  Like it is any better... it is still old tech, re-badged.

Intel and AMD has the wool over most peoples eyes.  Those who read here, who build their own rigs, Intel and AMD don't care about you.  Their pocketbooks are deep due to businesses of every size and the common home buyer, and that is who this "upgrade" product is for.  I can't count the number of people who ask if they can purchase an upgrade proc for their three year old Dell. BINGO! 

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HaitianSensation

like the article stated, it's primarily for low end users so I think ( and hope) that it won't filter down to hardcore overclockers.  I don't see the need so much in desktop computing as putting a new processor is not an issue.  I do think that it would be kind of interesting to see it used in laptops or netbooks that could somewhat "future-proof" your system and when the need arises to get more power out of your CPU, you can unlock it for a small fee rather than getting a whole new system.  But I would think that by that time, the unlocked version would be surpassed by technology.  Interesting but ultimately, I don't think it'll work out.

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Torcflaed

this idea is fine to a certain extant with software but if I pay for hardware and I own the hardware telling me I have to pay more to fully use something I already fully own is like selling a car rigged to never go over 30 MPH Unless you pay an extra fee to unlock the engine.

I would never consider buying a product I knew had this and would be deeply offended against Intel if I found out the chip I am using is rigged like this.

Listen up Intel; I paid for my hardware don't get me angry by trying to rip me off for additional profit.

There’s always AMD, and while on the subject, take the high road AMD don't do this, or if you are thinking of it, Don't!!!!

 

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fordian

It's a horrible idea for Intel.  In fact it stinks!

 

I hate the idea that some one would try to sell access and system resources for something the consumer already bought.  For anyone who buys into this, I have a bridge in Brooklyn for sale...I'll cut you a great deal!

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johnnyathm1

DIE SPAMMER, DIE!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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PCmike

I can understand selling products with bunk cores at a discounted price as an acceptable means to combat fabrication losses. But handicapping products like this is over the line. I know that this already occurs to some extent behind closed doors but if your cocky enough to sell a coupon to a consumer basically saying "hey remember six months ago when you paid a grand for that laptop..... well we ripped you off. Give me fifty bucks though and i'll turn it on turbo mode.'

 

I say get bent

 

I hope that it becomes super easy to work around that code and I hope if this goes through that AMD's market share triples

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geisterfahrer

 

Intel is acting like a blow job hooker. Gimme a fifty and you can do whatever you want. That promotion in relation to their "locked" cpus reminds me of exactly thatl. It is only locked until you pay that fifty.

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TheZomb

It would be nice if Intel did this instead of just locking chips, that way users could either buy the full chip right away or upgrade later and this way less "chip" gets wasted.

This spam is horrendus something is obviously not working.

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intelati

Its a new era of upgradeable computing, Not sure if I like the idea though. :/

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994196003

You would think that maximum pc would have some sort of spam filter, or they could kick off these people...

look below

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reutnes

I can't really imagine this system being put to use on enthusiest chips like the gulftown and whatnots.  I think this will be used more on prebuilt machines from best buy or walmart.. idiot consumers will see these cards in the checkout line and think "Oh, computer can get faster derp derp" and buy one. 

 

I'm sure Intel realizes that somebody interested in buying a high-end chip will also be a person with the knowledge to bypass the locks.

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Zachary K.

the layman wont understand, and wont upgrade.

the advanced users will crack, and unlock it without codes.

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Danthrax66

Torrenting processor speed is going to be awesome :D

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zNelson24

This would be useful in on retail PCs you get from WalMart, but I don't want to have to buy new cards if I build a new system.

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BAMT

This looks interesting. Too bad it needs Windows (or does it...).

And something funny from https://retailupgrades.intel.com/Page.aspx?Name=WhereToBuy :

Where to Buy
The following systems support CPU upgrades: 
 - System XYZ
CPU upgradeable systems can be purchased at participating stores from these retailers: 
 - Retailer 1
 - Retailer 2
 - Retailer 3

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Caboose

It's a BIOS unlock, so OS doesn't matter.

Just like overclocking your CPU is OS independent.

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Keith E. Whisman

This is just something that will end up being cracked. Sure, it maybe the CPU to get for the low end, but also enthusiasts can get it and crack the processor for free and then over clock the hell out of it.

I'd betcha that the G6951 isn't the only processor that comes with intentionally locked away performance and enhancements. 

I remember a month or so ago, I made a statement about something like this where a company like Intel would produce a chip with all kinds of features but with only a few features enabled for Version 1. Version 2 has the features of Version 1 and a few more features turned on. Version 3 has Version 1 and 2 features enabled and even more features turned on. Each version would be released every six months or more and be sold as a whole new chip, but it's actually the same chip as version 1 but with enabled features. 

It's all reality now.

Here's the article that I'm referring to.. http://www.maximumpc.com/article/news/intel_saves_hyperthreading_top_clocked_sandy_bridge_chips

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immersive

Great idea for low end parts

Great idea for mid range parts as long as its only to transform there mid range parts into "unlocked" extreme counterparts.

Take there i7-870 vs. i7-875k processors.

Right now the 870 is 290 and the 875 is 330.

That is a $40 price diff in the 2 even though they both have the same spec.

As long as the 870 works just like it dose but intel gives you the option to upgrade it to the 875 for $40 why not? You may never want it "Unlocked" but at less the option is there.

I would love to buy a i7-960 and it work just like the current i7-960 with the option to upgrade to a i7-975 Extreme Edition without having to take my processor out. But if this option changes the way the i7-960 works currently I would be very very pissed!

The upside to all this? Less CPUs to sort though with more options.

The downside? What if you try to sale your unlocked processor due to something new coming out you really wanted and the upgrade just did not seem worth it. Someone else may be able to buy it super cheap from you while Intel still makes a large chunk of change from whoever got it from you when you they upgrade it.

All this as long as the processor you buy WORKS as they currently do.

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Blaze589

This is a good idea for OEM vendors (Dell, HP, Sony, etc.) as their mainboards can't unlock the potential of the CPU anyhow. This will never happen on custom builds so don't worry.

The major problem stems from keygens and leaked keys so unless Intel has some unique unlock method this can't work. I personally don't think it will work because of this.

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AETAaAS

AMD's slate is not entirely clean either... I remember seeing some boards that are able to unlock cores on some AMD processors; at least AMD doesn't have the gall to charge you extra. And if I remember correctly, it's only if cores do not meet quality standards on printing, so they lock those cores.

But Intel, what the hell?!? I'd love for someone to come along with a keygen or something and shut this practice down.

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Mark17

AMD does release processors with locked cores, but the reason is because of quality standards. Actually, unlocking the cores on an AMD processor could be potentially dangerous to your system. They were locked for a reason. That's completely different than the case with Intel presented here, where they are taking perfectly capable hardware and restricting the performance. Intel is doing this strictly for profit, in the hopes that people are going to spend extra money to unlock the potential that's already there in the first place.

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Mark17

That has got to be one of the dumbest things I've ever heard. Intel is intentionally selling a CPU with locked potential? That is absurd. Then to unlock that potential they want you buy a $50 piece of paper with a number on it. Sorry, but I think I'll pass.

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bikerbub

that's exactly what they're doing now, and it's called marketing. all of the i7 processors are the same, they just have locked features, or locked cache, or w/e.

this is just allowing you to unlock it to the next level of processor without having to buy the actual processor all over again.

 

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BAMT

If I bought a Q6600 for $20 less than the Q6700, then later wanted the extra half multiplier, wouldn't I rather buy a scratch card than a new chip?

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Peanut Fox

A scratch card is $50.  Months down the line that $20 difference is gonna shrivle up like a rasin.  Doesn't seem very practical in this instance.  

At $50 in it seems more practical to go with a new CPU, as the performance it would unlock doesn't really seem worth it.  

What kind of performance does .5 multiplyer and 1MB of L3 cache translate to?

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machine66

Im glad I buy AMD and ASUS boards. I see intel lossing a few points in the AMD Intel battle.

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Caboose

I too am an AMD/Asus customer. Have been for years. I'll dabble in MSI now and then, but I seem to always go back to ASUS.

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schmitty6633

Gigabyte, Amd customer here.   Anyway, go AMD!

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tornato7

Can someone explain to me why chip makers release cpus that arent running as fast as they can? I guess it saves power, but why go to all the trouble of making that extra stuff if theyre not going to use it in a cpu?

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chipmunkofdoom2

It's a complicated issue. In this case it's just for money. In other cases, the high end processers and middle of the road processors are usually made the same way, out of the same parts and with the same "blueprint" if you will.

 

This is an over-simplification, but when CPU manufacturers make processors, they are all created on a huge wafer that vary in size from basket balls to serving trays. The manufacturers cut the processor cores up from this colossal wafer and test them. They test many different things, but they mostly test to see what speed the processor can run stably at. Because of how small the different parts of the CPU is, even if both cores were right next to each other on the same manufactured grid, they may be GHz apart in the speeds they can stably sustain. That's just how these things work.

 

One of the best examples of this was AMD's socket A Barton core processors. The 3200 was the high end chip, while the 2500 was the middle of the road chip. Overclockers quickly learned that the 2500 and 3200 were the exact same chip, but the 2500s were underclocked to ensure stable performance. With a healthy cooling system and a little BIOS tweaking, they had a 3200 for the price of a 2500.

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torn_apart71

Sounds like I'm moving to AMD!!

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nsvander

Intel,

Just release the damn CPU at its full potential and charge a few dollars more, you will make more with volume sales then you would with this stupid gimic.  What is joe consumer going to do when they call saying they cant read the key they bought after a few years, or they "Lost it".  I dont think most power users are going to deal with this, and the average PC user will just move onto to another brand and feel like intel was cheating them.  I mean seriously, you are saying that could release that same CPU for faster, but you just want $50 to do it, that would make me move over to AMD again.

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Eoraptor

Yeah, this will last about a week before someone puts out a crack for it, be it in a key generator, or a hacked bios.

What I am more concerned with... if you fat-finger the key say... three times, will that permenantly lock down, or even disably your Proc or Mobo?

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reutnes

CoreEnabler.Intel.PROPER.RAZOR1911.exe.torrent

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nmanguy

Would that be hardware piracy, or what?

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Peanut Fox

I think it would just be regular theft cause you stole performance.  Persoannaly I'd just call it overclocking.  

I think it would fall into the same category as Jail Breaking an iPhone. 

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pseizure2000

I usually never say this but when I first saw that "product key" pic the first thing that came to my mind...

lol

 

Bring on the bios cracks.

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pseizure2000

I usually never say this but when I first saw that "product key" pic the first thing that came to my mind...

lol

 

Bring on the bios cracks.

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RedAnt751

This just shows you what they think of there Customers. This is why I only

buy AMD chips.

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