Id Software's Tim Willits on Diablo DRM: “In The End, It's Better for Everybody”

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Svetty Parabols

"It is a shame that a company like Iron Lore had to go out of business, and yes, due to piracy.."

 

"On February 27, 2008 it was announced that Iron Lore Entertainment had closed down owing to an inability to secure funding for its next project" - Wikipedia

 

"In a post to its Web site, Iron Lore said that financial issues were the primary cause of the studio's abrupt shuttering. "It is with great regret that we must announce that as of close of business Tuesday, February 19, 2008 Iron Lore Entertainment has ceased active game development," reads the post. "Several unrelated events occurred which resulted in Iron Lore being unable to secure funding for its next project."" - Gamespot

It was some THQ douchebag who claimed it was piracy. Get your facts straight before posting.

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Exarkun1138

Actually, Svetty, I remember that this report of Iron Lore's demise was due to piracy came from MAXIMUM PC, and so I took that as the correct info. I never pursued it after I read that, thinking that MPC got the story straight from Iron Lore, and moved on to other things. If THEY, MPC, were incorrect, then I was incorrect, but not at fault. So excuse me if I stated a falsehood, but it was un-intentional. My point was more to the fact that a great company like Iron Lore isn't around to give us more Titan Quest style games that could have smacked Blizzard and their DRM for Diablo 3 to hell! 

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lindethier

This sums it up pretty well for me.

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Springfield45

It is better for me that publishers are crippling their games with draconian DRM scheams.

It helps me save money, because I shall not be purchasing them.

Thank goodness for indie developers that are willing to have faith in their paying customers.

Thank goodness for Good Old Games.

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stradric

I take issue with your assertion that Diablo 3 will be crippled because of this, and your horrendous spelling of the word scheme.

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Exarkun1138

Well, some of us do not like having a heavy handed DRM get in the way of enjoying a game. When I buy a game, I want to be able to play that game on my terms. I bought it. I put down my hard earned money for it. It's like this: How would you like it if you bought a new car, and then the dealer placed a restriction that you could only drive your car 30 miles a day, and only between the hours of 8am and 5pm. You probably wouldn't buy a car from that dealer, right? This "draconian" DRM, as some have called it, acts very much like this in that it restricts when and how I can play Diablo 3

I live in Houston, Texas, and in 2008 we got hit by Hurricane Ike. My power was back on 4 days later, but due to the damage, I didn't regain Internet access until 9 days later. During that time I was able to at least play games on my PC without the need for the Internet. If this happens when I have Diablo 3, I won't be able to at least pass the time with a good ol' D3 session without my Internet access, and that sucks! Sorry, but I take issue with your assertion that this DRM is OK for the masses! 

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stradric

That sounds horrible.  9 days with no internet...  Imagine: You might actually have to pick up a book or, worse, have a conversation with someone.

There are at least 11 million WoW subscribers that definitely can meet the always-online requirement.  There are likely many millions more that can as well.  If you can't, don't buy the game.  It's really that simple.

If there was offline mode, the next thing you'd be complaining about is that you need to start a new offline character during your 9 days without internet.

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Exarkun1138

That was my whole point, pal. I should be able to play a game when there is no internet. I did read, and had conversations with people, as I always do. The internet is not my main gig, mind you. But when it is REQUIRED to play a game, I say, NO THANKS. 

If you like the idea of this, good for you......I, on-the-other-hand, do not, and will not be giving Blizzard my money for Diablo 3 as I did for Diablo's 1 and 2. I will use my purchasing power to help other game companies who do not have such a ridiculous DRM routine. 

Thanks so much for playing....have a nice day!

 

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CaptainFabulous

And we won't buy that game. Yes, it really is that simple. If you don't mind Blizzard's spybot program Battle.net looking over your shoulder watching every little thing you do while you play, then by all means give them your money.

Me? Not a chance in hell.

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aarcane

In diablo 2, you could always play alone on battle.net or you could sign off and play solo offline.  the offline characters were alone. isolated from everyone on bn, and so be it.  if that's how you chose to play, that's how it was, end of story.

Removing the option to play offline is going to suck for some, and I don't like not having the option.  but at the end of the day, I always play on bn anyway, so while I don't like the decision, I won't be seriously impacted by it beyond not buying the game in protest of this decision.

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Caladahis

I agree with you. I loved playing D2 offline solo from time to time just to ejoy it...but not that will not be possible.

 

I mean if you are shelling out $60 for a video game...y not let us use mods and hacks for solo play (I don't but I have friends who do) ...I mean these characters cannot be transfered to online play so we really are not cheating at all...so what is the harm in this...we pay for it let us play how we want.

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don2041

Tim Willits should have to get down on all fours and eat that shit he just dumped

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Xessive

"If we could force people to always be connected when you play the game, and then have that be acceptable, awesome."

Any sentence that starts with forcing people to do something and ends with "and then have that be acceptable" is generally a red flag for unacceptable behaviour.

I'm beginning to think that these restrictive DRM measures aren't meant to prevent piracy, rather they seem more like an excuse to monitor the players.

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stradric

Yes, prevention of cheating is a huge part of this.  Piracy is also.  Profit is the 3rd part.  When you have a real money auction house, prevention of cheating is an absolute requirement.  Otherwise people could just hex edit expensive items into their inventory to be sold.

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Shadist

I don't think they are meant to prevent piracy.

Nor do I think they are meant to monitor the players.

I think it's a way of making money. 1st you make people be online all the time, no local saves of games for people to mod. 2nd you don't allow modding at all. 3rd you make a "for real cash" auction house in game.

Step 4 = Profit!

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RaptorJohnson

I'm in the military and I don't get internet in my tent (I have to use the morale tent's computers to check my email/rant on forums).

 

How are we supposed to play this game Mr Blizzard?  Because if this catches on it will kill PC gaming for me and I refuse to haul an Xbox and TV to afganistan.

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Kinetic

I'm not seeing a ton of it here, but it irritates me when people get upset about this kind of drm and comment about how it inconveniences them, and then everyone who doesn't care whether it's there or not constantly chants "how often are you offline anyway" in reply. Yet when people like you and the poster below me give a very real situation and logical explanation for why they can't meet this standard, none of the diehards who are so sure this is for their own good respond. Also, you guys rock. Stay safe, hope you're home soon.

Then there are normal people like me, who live in a city and have broadband, only even that isn't always reliable. Just the other day I went to play some Global Agenda, only I couldn't because my internet was down. No reason, no planned outage, just down. Whatever. I didn't rage about it, I just played some crysis then went to work. However if ALL games switched to this standard, that means I wouldn't have been able to play anything. So how is that moving forward exactly?

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Happy

The only way it would be progress would be if it sped up the internetification of every square inch of America. When we have 16 terabyte per second internet in every american home as well as free wireless access no matter where you are in the country then we'll be in good shape. If internet access is necessary to play all games then the outcry to have free wireless everywhere and have internet in every american home will be tremendous. But that would be the only possible good to come of this clampdown the gaming industry is seeing fit to shove down the throats of the public. And this isn't even a guaranteed outcome. If it happened it would be great but putting this internet requirement into all games will be no means guarantee that faster and wider internet access will become a reality any faster than it otherwise would.

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Xandur

Agreed.  I’m currently chillin' over here in sunny Kandahar Afghanistan with no internet.  Guess I won't be playing... maybe I’ll look into one of those "cracked" versions that will inevitably be available.  All you're doing is driving people toward Pirated games.  So Mr. Tim Willits, in the end, I say "you’re a douche".

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Nuxes

And if you want to play offline, there will always be cracks.  As long as there is a group of people out there who don't like DRM, they will find a way around it.

I can understand the point of DRM designed to keep pirates from ruining the experience of legit customers, but if I want to play a game on my own, I should be able to do that.

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stradric

I don't see how that would work if it's actually true that this game doesn't have any kind of local save option (which I doubt despite Pardo's claim).  For Starcraft 2, the crackers made it work by exploiting offline mode and guest accounts.  If Diablo 3 doesn't have an offline mode, then the hackers would need to write their own local save subroutine or emulate battle.net.  Neither of those options are simple cracks and would end up leaving you with a very unstable product.  Also, even though you want to rationalize it that way, piracy is still not justified in this case.

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Nuxes

I'm not advocating piracy, I'm just saying it's inevitable, and that no matter how complicated the DRM, somebody will crack it. And using that crack to play my legitimately purchased copy of the game is not illegal.

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CaptainFabulous

Piracy is always justified when a publisher makes boneheaded decisions like this.

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routine

No, it's not. Piracy is never justified.

Complain, yes. Petition, sure. Protest even, ok.

But to steal it b/c you don't like something they did, not a chance.

If you want to hurt them, don't buy the product. Don't play the game.

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tuscanitunr

I couldn't agree more with this.  Said perfectly.  Wonder when the idiots of these so called "juggernaut" games are going to understand that concept.

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