Windows 7 Upgrade Guide: All Your Questions Answered

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dennisb

i bought vista 64bit home premium on july 10 and to find out that i do not qualify for the free upgrade. not only that but i paid more than what it is shown now. why is it that the vista was listed cheaper that includes it vs. the one i bought which is 30 dollars more.

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paulkalman

two things:

1. even though I carefully installed rc1 instructing it to make me a "windows.old" it did not.

2. I installed it and it gave me no choice as to version. I had hoped to have 'home professional" and got "ultimate".

 I just saw in this article that when the sw released I will have to blow my setup with all my hand installed sw to put the "legal" version on. I am not at all worried about my data but, in the past, even though sw works with an upgrade it sometimes does not function when hard installed on a new build.

This is not really a very good solution. There really should be a good legal way to make the RC "released" without all of the headaches associted with a new build. this is no wy for microsoft to reward all of us beta / rc users hard work debugging their sw for them

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maple1985

I have windows XP (OEM) that came with my laptop (bought in 2004).I am planning to buy a Mac and will need windows there using vmware. So I am wondering if I can buy windows 7 with upgrade option based on my XP copy?

Thanks for the help

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floridaman339

Well, I did it - took the plunge. Installed as upgrade on Vista Home Premium laptop. Other than taking 5.5 hours and deleting some of my executables, it went pretty smooth. Sure wish it gave me my PAID versions of the HP sample games instead of deleting them and reinstalling the demo (expired) versions. But, I guess that's M$!

 

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jlamar

I just did the same.

Time: aprox. 3 hours

Compatibility: 90% (issues with BitDefender, Windows Mobile 6.1, SQL 2005, Creative 24-bit External Sound Card)

Improved performance: aprox. 256 MB less in RAM usage (Will report PCMark comparison at later date)

Other thoughts: Did not see the option for Windows 7 Home Premium, just got Ultimate.

Upgrade erased GRUB boot for Linux, no big deal though, easily fixed.

Very nice looking. Better graphics that Vista for sure.

Better layout and controls seem more intuitive.

Eager to see if I get improved performance over Vista that is noticable.

 

"People don't care how much you know until they know how much you care." John Maxwell

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jlamar

PCMark Vantage Vista Home Premium 64 bit: 4208

After in-place upgrade to Windows 7 Ultimate: 4663

After trying to tweak some HP (Hewlett Packard) software, I got some insanely weird and irreversable issues. Had to go back to original OS.

Other Thoughts: I did a complete partition backup using EasyUS Disk Copy (Free) http://www.easeus.com/disk-copy/

Restoring my old OS and programs was flawless after I broke Windows 7.

It was a nice test. I got to see what really worked and what didn't. With the backup, I'll also be ready to upgrade permanently after the RC is over. I may try it again and just not mess with any of the HP native software.

HP HDX18T 18.5" laptop; Intel T9400; Nvidia 9600M GT

"People don't care how much you know until they know how much you care." John Maxwell

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nekollx

 no that's HP, MS didn't make those games or make them part of Vista. So i has no way of knowing their demos or full

------------------------------
Coming soon to Lulu.com --Tokusatsu Heroes--
Five teenagers, one alien ghost, a robot, and the fate of the world.

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Stever

I pre-ordered the Pro Upgrade for my Vista box, planning to do a clean install.  MS had better offer the option of proving Vista ownership by inserting the disc or entering the key.  I will be seriously pissed off if, down the road when I want to do a fresh reinstall of 7 Pro, I have to first reinstall Vista, update and activate.  That's complete bull$hit. 

If MS does force me to have Vista installed/updated/activated as proof of ownership, the only reason they'll do it is to cause me enough pain that I cancel my 7 Pro Upgrade pre-order and buy the full retail installer, and they'll probably succeed.

 

 

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Quitadamo06

I'm getting a copy on release and I'm pretty sure my system will handle an upgrade decently. I hope. What do you think? I've got a clean install of Vista x64 that's been on here for about a year.

System:

CPU: Q6600

DFI Lanparty board

Nvidia 9800gtx video card 

6gigs of ddr2 800 dram

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internetReklam

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grandduke

 

Great article, but I think I'm missing the obvious.

I run an OEM version of Windows Vista premium.  I haveno OEM CD's, back up cd's, restore cd's, passkeys, nothing (I know, I'm horrible, I was ignorant in the past).

What I'm trying to figure out is if Window 7 upgrade is theproduct for me.  I like the cheaper price tag but here are my concerns.

Since I have no cd copy of Vista and or product key can I upgradeto Windows 7?

Should I just bite the bullet and purchase a full version ofWindows 7?

I'm not concerned at all about multiple installs, I don't care toever go back to vista, or anything like that.

My only other concern is, once Iinstall Windows 7, and for whatever reason I need to reinstall the OS, can I doit?

So, my questions additional are, with no cd or passkey of my WindowsVista, can I perform a complete format and install with Windows 7 Upgrade, ordo I need the full version of Windows 7?

Thanks in advance for any answers! 

 

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floridaman339

Get a copy of a backup program like Spotmau or Ghost, and backup first. The time spent may be well worth it! With external HDDs as cheap as they are, it is a no-brainer!

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bruffstuff

Download Magic Jelly Bean Keyfinder (search Google)

Run key finder

Write down key.

and done

---Cheapest thing to do is find the OEM install cds on Ebay, many admins sell tons of copies since they use a volume key license.

 

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nekollx

 I'm not getting the blurb about Vista for 10 bucks. Does that mean Vista is retailing for 10 bucks now and if i buy vista i can upgrade for free to 7 in 3 months?

------------------------------
Coming soon to Lulu.com --Tokusatsu Heroes--
Five teenagers, one alien ghost, a robot, and the fate of the world.

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B.A.Frayd

I am currently running Vista Home Premium OEM. I am planning on installing the Windows 7 Upgrade on this current machine when it is released in Oct.

Will I be able to install that same copy of Windows 7 Upgrade if I upgrade my hardware, or build a new computer in a year or two?

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alanmc76

The short anser is yes.  But, you will have to plan ahead.  First, as many others have pointed out recently, don't lose your XP or Vista software.  At the very least, you will have to reinstall one of them and activate it before reloading Win 7.  Or, if you are a capable builder, make a disc image with the correct drivers already installed.

 

-- "What am I, MacGyver? Fix it with what?"--

 

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B.A.Frayd

Thanks for the reply. I'm still not clear though. My main concern is the fact that I am using an OEM version of Vista. Will I be able to use the OEM key for the Windows7 Upgrade disk if I build a new computer, or will the OEM key not be accepted because it is, technically, only for the original build? Thanks.
 Read more >>   Options >>   

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mpcrsc562

has there been any word on oem pricing yet?

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DataCabbitKSW

Thank you Justin Kerr for providing an incredibly well formed article that answers most of the upgrade questions for people with regards to Windows 7. Just about anything you didn't answer, has either been answered over on the official Windows 7 RC Support Forum (located here http://tinyurl.com/9fhdl5 ), or has not been announced at all from Microsoft yet. The next week  should see some nice announcements considering the conferences coming up. I'm looking forward to October 22nd more and more.

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TurboGFF

Hey guys, I have a question. I was running a 'non validated' version of XP pro before doing a clean format and install of Win7 RC1.  I recently pre-ordered the Home premium win7 upgrade at that low price. My question is, can I upgrade (and by upgrade I mean clean install/format) from Rc1 to a full retail copy using the upgrade disk I preordered? Or should I start looking around for an old winXP key...

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Kargg

I ran the Securable program and it told me that my hardware virtualization was "Locked On" I read the comments it made about it, but still don't understand what it means.

I did run MS's Virtual PC a while ago, but thought I had uninstalled it.

 

So, what does it mean? I really still don't understand it.

Thanks.

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robesaw

OK, one of two BURNING questions I have -

 When I built my Vista machine I partitioned the drive (actually a raid5).  I never liked it because I could never get Vista to recognize that my data was on drive D instead of C.

 So, I'm thinking to go away from partitions altogether and want to have only one drive letter for the upgrade.  Do I need to do a fresh install to remove the partition?  Can I remove the partition durinng install?

Thanks.

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amadeus

My HP Pavilion desktop (a 2007 model) came pre-installed with Vista Home Premium. I don't have the OS' OEM or Retail DVDs; just the System Restore discs. The OS files for System Restore are backed up in the D drive.

If I do an in-place upgrade to Windows 7 -

  • What will be the validation process?
  • My D drive with the factory restore OS files will remain intact, right?

 

If I do a complete install -

  • What will be the validation process?
  • I can choose to leave the D drive's files untouched, right?

 

Is it correct to assume that, irrespective of an in-place or clean install, I can always restore Vista Home Premium using my System Restore discs (Factory setting)?

 Help?

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floridaman339

I just did an RC Win 7 upgrade last night. My D Drive is still intact (HP Backup), it looks like. Win 7 will install on your C Drive, and the D Drive is a totally different partition. I would guess that a clean install (like when the actual retail product comes out and I have to do a clean install) just might wipe that out -- so, if in doubt - image the drive first!  I did!

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Justin.Kerr

Amadeus,

 The validation process hasn't been officially released, but you will definatly have the option to do an in-place upgrade, and probably even a clean install.

You are also correct that your system restore disks will always alow you to return to Vista. Your OEM copy on the restore disks shouldn't require activation, so you should be okay.

And yes, you pick which drive to Install Windows 7 on and everything (including your D drive) would be left alone.

Good luck!

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amadeus

Thank you for clarifying my questions and for this very informative and helpful article.

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doronb2

Hi,

Do you know something about this -

Thread in Amazon's forum (PRESS ME)

Someone wrote there - "If you are going to use it in a country other than the US it should not be a problem. Just validate it here"

Do you know something about it??

My friend has already ordered a copy for me...

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Gurezaemon

I have a Japanese OEM version of Windows XP - can I use the upgrade pricing to get English versions of Windows 7?

I'm aware I'll need to do a fresh install...

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Justin.Kerr

This worked in Vista, no indication it would change.

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Mykle

I will not buy this upgrade version of Windows 7. I spoke to a Microsoft Rep today and he confirmed that you must have Vista (I only asked about Vista) installed currently on your hard drive in order to install Windows 7. The disk is not capable of installing on an empty hard drive. Yes it is a clean install but I will not be bothered with first installing Vista before I install 7. That is a total waste of time. Windows already takes too long to install. After buying an upgrade copy of 7, installing Windows will turn into an all day procedure.

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willsmith

The guy you spoke with is 100% wrong. While you can't do an in-place upgrade over XP, you can do a clean install with an Upgrade edition of Windows 7. You'll just be prompted to insert the XP disc or give your XP activation code before you can do the clean install.

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alanmc76

 Will,

This isn't the Will Smith - Editor in Chief of MaximumPC, is it? 

If so, I am apalled that you did not get your facts straight on this one.  As Justin stated in the article, yes, you must have 2000, XP, or Vista currently running and activated on the machine you intend to use a Win 7 Upgrade disc on.  The days of insterting a disc during setup ended with XP.  Vista removed this option, and all available information states this has not changed in Win 7.  This has also been a hot topic on TechNet lately.  Of course, MS might still change this before October rolls around, we can hope.

 _________________________________________

-- "What am I, MacGyver? Fix it with what?"--

 

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AZWizo

Wow dude that is way cool. I have been using Windows 7 for about 3 weeks now and I LOVE it! Vista would crash constantly and I have not crashed oncesince upgrading to 7.

 

RT
http://www.anonymize.tk

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whiplash55

Got my upgrades at Micro Center for 39 and 89 bucks for Home Premium and Pro. respectivly. Seems like a fair price to me I think MS should make the discount price permenant.

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FK_name

 This is from the Future Shop website.  Scroll down to the bottom, to the heading "Upgrade path to Windows 7" - it shows who can and can't do 'in-place upgrades' - it seems only Win7 Ultimate will allow a broad choice of in-place installs.

 http://www.futureshop.ca/popup/windows7_lightbox01.asp

 - this is the page the above link comes from;

http://www.futureshop.ca/marketing/windows7/default.asp?langid=EN&logon=&langid=EN

--

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Comic Book Guy

I don't agree with what MS is doing with the Win7 discount, everyone who buys a computer now with Vista on it gets a coupon to upgrade to Win7, what of those of us who bought Vista before now...we have to pay full price for Win7!

 

Comic Book Guy

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baGoGoodies111

I know they say that you will have to do a clean install of Windows 7 to your computer if you are using Win7 RC, however I'm gonna put a couple of figurative dollars on some of the developers over at Technet, because when they released the RC, they posted a workaround for people to do an in-place upgrade from the Beta.  So in my opinion, it may not be entirely out of the question, I guess it would just depend on whats more to add from RC - Retail Copy.

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gatorXXX

Justin Kerr is right folks. You CAN upgrade XP but it will wipe your drive and you will have a clean install. Vista users can EITHER do a clean install, or an in place upgrade. The inplace upgrade WILL NOT delete any programs or folders you may have.

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floridaman339

Did an upgrade last night and some of my program folders have NO .exe files in them anymore!

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Ravenlord

HOW HARD IS THIS TO UNDERSTAND? MICROSOFT SAYS THE UPGRADE DISKS CANT BE USED TO DO A CLEAN INSTALL, ONLY AN I-PLACE UPGRADE. I asked the reps at least 5 times. They reiterated the same thing over and over... the upgraded disks do not work to make a clean install... they cant do it. For clean installs you have to buy the full program. Please verify this with microsoft if you must. I was ready to do this and got shot down, but not before getting stuck with the disks. Believe me, i want to upgrade, but according to MS, I will have to purchase the full program disks to upgrade from XP cause those are the only disks that allow a clean install.

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Justin.Kerr

Find me a link to creditable source that says upgrade disks won't offer a clean install.

I provided you with one from the Microsoft store supporting the facts presented in this article, and can easily supply the two others I gathered during my research.

Microsoft's own store uses the term "clean install" with regards to the upgrade process for these two OS's.

http://store.microsoft.com/microsoft/Windows-7-Home-Premium-Upgrade/product/B0F9E641

 

 

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willsmith

Justin is 100% correct. As was the case with Vista, there are only two Windows 7 discs, the 32-bit one and the 64-bit one. Each disc contains the code for all versions of the OS (Home, Home Premium, Pro, Ultimate, Starter, etc), as well as the code to either do an in-place upgrade or a clean install. The thing that determines what happens when you use the disc is the code on the label.

If you buy an Upgrade disc and want to do a clean install, you can. You'll need to present proof of ownership of an earlier version of Windows though. That could be either the disc or a key, I haven't tried it yet, so I don't know.

Microsoft has never forced Upgrade disc owners to install the previous version of an OS on a reinstall, just to upgrade it immediately. That's dumb and counterproductive.

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FK_name

Oops

--

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guoruiwu1994

Windows 2000 is not upgradable to Windows 7.

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Isol

It is un-upgradable, per se.  But according to MS, you can use the Windows 7 Upgrade disc on a Windows 2000 install to get Win7.  It just involves a fresh install.

 "If you have Windows XP or Windows 2000, you can purchase Windows 7 Upgrade versions. But you must back up your files, clean install, and reinstall your applications."

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Ravenlord

I just spent 30 min. with a microsoft rep who explained to me that the upgrade options only work with Vista owners. The cds contain only an in-place option on machines that are currently running vista. Any xp users have to do a complete installation, which is not available with the upgrade disks. This caveat is not mentioned on your article. Nowhere do you state that the cds that come with the upgrade purchases, for any version, are unable to do a full install on xp machines. XP owners cant take advantage of the upgrade offers cause the cds will not be able to do a full installation on their machines. YOU NEED TO CLARIFY THIS TO YOUR READERS. I WAS MISLEAD BY YOUR ARTICLE AND WOULD HAVE BEEN STUCK WITH UNUSABLE UPGRADE DISKS ON MY XP MACHINE, HAD I NOT FOLLOWED THRU N CK ON MY ORDER TODAY!!!!

 

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Justin.Kerr

 http://store.microsoft.com/microsoft/Windows-7-Home-Premium-Upgrade/product/B0F9E641

This is taken from the official Microsoft Store:

  • Running Windows Vista?
  • If you have Windows Vista, you can purchase Windows 7 Upgrade versions. You can do a clean install (back up your files, clean install, and reinstall your applications) or an in -place upgrade (Windows 7 installs over Windows Vista).
  • Running Earlier Versions?
  • If you have Windows XP or Windows 2000, you can purchase Windows 7 Upgrade versions. But you must back up your files, clean install, and reinstall your applications.

It appers you were given bad information. That was part of the motivation behind this article actually, we wanted to compile what we know, from the best sources we could find.

 

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narnith

Ok, I'm a little confused here. This is an upgrade person, right? But us Xp have to perform a clean install. So, do we like have to enter the product key for XP, or is it gonna use an honor system where it assumes there was a previous installation? ><

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Justin.Kerr

As mentioned in the article, XP did a disk check, but Vista checked that you had a valid install.

The article discusses work arounds if they go with the Vista approach to avoid you having to do a double install, but we'll have to wait and see what MS settles on.

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Ardias

Since there has been some debate here and elsewhere where I've looked for this answer, I decided to try going through Microsoft's own Store Support to see what kind of an answer I would get.  I figured this was as good a source as any since they will actually be selling the software, so one would think they would know.  Hopefully this is insight that will put some questions to rest.  (At least it does for me.)

Here's my original question and the response I received this afternoon.

I am currently running Windows XP Home Edition, and I own this operating system as a full version. And I am aware that for users currently running Windows XP, If you have Windows XP, you can purchase Windows 7 Upgrade versions. But you must back up your files, clean install, and reinstall your applications.

My question is this, however.  If I purchase an WIndows 7 Upgrade version in October and install it, and then at some future time wish to build an entirely new computer, or I need or want to replaced my primary hard drive (thus requiring a new installation of Windows 7 onto the replacement drive), will I have to *first* install my old (full) version of Windows XP in order for the Windows 7 Upgrade to then be usable?  Or, would this not be necessary, and when I go to install Windows 7 from the Upgrade version CD - onto an entirely blank hard drive - would I simply be able to enter my original Windows XP product key or insert the original WIndows XP CD.  Basically, if I was rebuilding my computer system in the future, would an Upgrade version of Windows 7 require a fully installed an activated version of Windows XP to already be in place before the Windows 7 upgrade installation procedure could begin?

There seems to be a considerable amount of debate as to the answer to this question on the Internet, and I was hoping for a definitive answer.

Thank you for you time and assistance.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 

Microsoft Store Support [Store.STOR.00.00.EN.ARV.KIT.TS.T01.SPT.00.EM@css.one.microsoft.com]

Subject: RE: SRX1114281437ID - Microsoft Store:Product question:Product on the Microsoft :License or product key question

Dear Paul,

Thank you for contacting the Microsoft Store Customer Care Team.

I appreciate the opportunity to assist you today. I understand you would like some clarification about the Upgrade process involved with Windows 7.

Windows 7 Upgrade versions will require a previous version of Windows installed and activated on your computer in order to work. If you need to change computers or hard drives, or reformat your computer you would need to install your original Windows operating system and then install Windows 7 Upgrade over that.

If you have any further questions or wish to place an order you may do so online at www.microsoftstore.com or reach us by phone, Monday to Friday 8am to 1am EST and Saturday and Sunday between the hours of 12pm and 8pmEST at 1-877-MY-MSSTORE (1-877-696-7786).

Thank you for using the Microsoft Store,

Scott M.
The Microsoft Store Customer Care Team

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 

This for me is enough to get me to shell out the extra $100 bucks to get a full version.  The Microsoft rep's answer was pretty clear.  Though you can use the Windows 7 Upgrade to move from XP to Windows 7, the Windows XP you're upgrading from needs to be *installed and activated.*  We won't get away with it simply reading your old XP cd-rom or typing in the original product key. 

That said, the time and effort of first having to do an install and activation of my Windows XP Home (full version) just to be able to subsequently install the Windows 7 upgrade every time I want to do a clean install is not worth the $100 saving. 

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