Why Hackers Write Computer Viruses

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RedAnt751

Good article.

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essjay22

I just read this article on Gizmodo and that article had none of the spelling or grammar mistakes this one does. Guys, get a real speelchecker K?

 s

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ABouman

What mistakes are you referring to? We copy straight from Giz, so nothing was altered from the original article as far as content, spelling, grammar... We're happy to correct errors when we see them, especially since our CMS does NOT feature any type of spell check option, which makes it a little harder to catch errors before stories are published live.

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Audie

Osama bin Hackers

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clutchsins

If I'm not mistaken, I thought the first virus was the cloner virus on the Apple II's?

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MaximumMike

The Apple II was not a PC.

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Nimrod

Uh, yes it was, as were and are all of them.

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MaximumMike

Ummm... I'm pretty sure it didn't run an X86 architecture. Hence, it was not a PC.

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TerribleToaster

Mike is right that Apple II's are not PC's. Because PC's were an IBM product. 

But the Apple II is still a computer (called a Home Computer, rather than a Personal Computer) and the Elk Cloner was the first widespread computer virus outbreak, though before that there was the Pervading Animal trojan and before that there was the first virus I know of, the Creeper Virus (which was made as a kind of proof of concept that viruses could be made).

 

What made Brain special was it was the first PC virus (PC as the IBM PC).

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MaximumMike

Very good article, but I could have done without the F-bomb. For some reason Gizmodo writers seem to thrive on dropping vulgarities in their stories. It brings with it a twinge of unprofessionalism.

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ascendant

I honestly didn't even notice the "f-bomb" until reading the comments about it.

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TerribleToaster

It's seem to stem form that fact that they are solely a blog. MPC does publish some of its articles from here in print (they are a magazine after all) so they seem to have to abide by higher standards. 

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codepath

Was he disappointed because you allowed him the opportunity to infect your iPod or because you had the complete Taylor Swift discography on it?

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germanogre

"Why Hackers Write Computer Viruses"

Money, Notoriety and Vandalism. that simple. it seems that
there is no shortage of people who take pleasure in
wrecking other peoples' property. I have enough to
worry about with teenagers smashing my car windows, or
batting my mailbox.

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DoctorOwl

Fortunately, you are wrong. This kind of comment is in the same league as, "A priest abused children. Every priest is a child abuser." I am a famous virus writer, or I was two decades ago, and I'm going to give you a history lesson.

In the beginning, there were three kinds of people involved in the computer virus scene; the originals who started everything from the 90s to the early 2000s. We wrote computer viruses as art, and shared source code for the purposes of social bonding on BBSs and IRC. We were not children, not vandals, and did nothing but "write a book" to share secret tricks of narrative and turns of phrase with our closest friends in private networks; long before social media like Facebook was even an idea in someone's imagination. Few of us exist anymore. After a decade, all the art is done, and we've moved onto other things.

Then there are other people who took our work, and spread them on computers. These people have little in common with real computer virus writers. They were mostly curious, and/or stupid kids doing things in a different era where things were different and can't be judged to the same standard as today. I doubt these people exist anymore either, because their source (the original virus writers) have mostly disappeared.

Then there's the third type, which sprouted in the past decade, which is the hardcore hackers doing horrific things with spam, botnet (denial of service) attacks, and scamming people out of money; sometimes (allegedly) through organised crime. Those are the people to be afraid of, and way outnumber those of us originally involved in the art form.

Computer viruses themselves were not malicious, nor were the people that wrote them. But over time, the love of money has corrupted people, which has corrupted the art. Sometimes I feel sad seeing the reputation virus writers now, but it was not always this way. 

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SilverSurferNHS

Didn't know you guys were allowed to publish the word "fuck" in an article unless it was referenced in quotes from a source... so i thought i'd leave mine unsencored as well just to see what would happen :)

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bikerbub

wouldn't it be sort of silly for a publication to be in favor of net neutrality, but in the same light, advocate censorship?

also, technically, the whole article is quoted, as it is from their sister publication Gizmodo.

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SilverSurferNHS

i gotta pay more attention to the authors... that makes sense; i was assuming (making an ass of myself!!) that it would be published iin the magazine though, which is where it would be a prob

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avenger48

I would assume that there is no regulation which prevents them from publishing an f-bomb in a magazine, although their parent company probably wouldn't like it.  After all, why would the government censor a word when there are magazines that show uncensored pictures of the deed the word refers to?

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bpstone

Good article.

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Gezzer

So who's playing who in the movie adaptation? The iPod bit at the end was priceless. lol

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