White Paper: Surge Suppression

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Vladislav_Draculva

Personally I am quite hung up on my Monster TM. Surge Protector...I swear by them after lightning struck my house...it fried my first monster surge protector...but it saved my computer...so I will never use anything but...I will live on Ramen before I let my computer go without it's monster surge protector...

 ~Steele~

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M1K3Z0R

My good'ol Tripp lite that I bought back in 2001 takes a lickin and keeps on tickin, but whenever possible I prefer to play it safe and just unplug my electronics from the outlet. Maybe it's just paranoia, but i don't trust those "soft" power switches on some of the ups units (the hard switches on most power bars I'm ok with, but rather unplug it anyway - except for the one that requires a leg or two against the wall to pull from the outlet :P)

Apperantly there is alot more that can kill your precious circuits too, even if unplugged! (EMP anyone?)

Anything's Hot Swappable if you're fast enough...

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Leif52pickup

These do exist and need to be installed by a licensed electrician. Some Home Depots offer installation of these, and I imagine lots of other companies do as well.

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meyerpflug

What about Series Mode Surge Protection, like Brickwall or SurgeX?  Is it better than using MOVs?  Is it overkill?

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Vegan

What I'd like to know is, why don't they just build them into houses?

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meyerpflug

Here's an article about protecting your entire home from surges.

http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/article/0,,387874,00.html

 

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Doc Driza

I would like to know the amount of families that DO NOT have a computer, vs. the amount of people that do. Also, in a lot of the newer homes being built they wire them for network connectivity, so why not incorporate surge protection?

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Fubie

Cost and complexity.  Pure and simple.  Most circuits in a house do not need to be constantly protected since all power protection devices can sustain damage/degredation even when not protecting anything.

The best option is to add the protection when and where you need it.

Fubie

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Fubie

Mike this looks suspiciously like a request I sent in at the beginning of July and  I'm glad to see the start.  We all worry so much about having the most powerful computer equipment around but no one seems to take power protection seriously.  It would be great if we could have a white paper on line conditions isolation transformers too.  It would be good to explain what UL 1449 is versus ANSI/IEEE C62.41 (Formerly IEEE 587).  On and on.  Anyhow thanks for the write up!

Anyone interested, here (http://www.powervar.com/technical-articles.cfm) is a link to some great articles on surge suppression, line conditioning and more.

Fubie

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mclovin

I've always wondered, if I have something super valuable to protect, or I only have access to low quality surge protectors, would plugging two surge protectors in series provide more protection than one alone?

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mesiah

For the most protection, just buy an uninterruptable power supply. A good UPS converts the AC signal to DC and feeds it into the battery, then converts the DC from the battery back to AC and sends it to your equipment. A power spike will never reach your equipment, only burn up your UPS.

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lhatten

This is not entirley true.  It depends on the type of UPS.  The most common (cheapest) UPS are the Standby UPS type.  They do not use the inverter until the power goes off.  Most of the other, more expensive, UPS do go thruough the inverter at all times.  If you wish better line conditioning, you have to pay the bucks.  A fuller explaination is at:

http://www.apcmedia.com/salestools/SADE-5TNM3Y_R5_EN.pdf

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mesiah

Hehe, thats what I meant by a "good ups" I guess I should have been more specific :) Thanks for the link, it's very informative.

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Vegan

Every surge protector instructions I've ever seen specifically say not to daisy chain them.

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