White Paper: Internet Protocol

7

Comments

+ Add a Comment
avatar

mclovin

Is it just me, or does this seem incomplete? Like...it just ends. I keep looking for the "next" button?

avatar

aaronj2906

The author has completely ignored the OSI Stack, to which there are 7 layers. I almost mistook this article as something eminating from the new THG, due to inaccuracies.

Application
Presentation
Session
Transport
Network
Datalink
Physical

I have seen references to the 4-layer version in Microsoft certification books. Addiitonally, I have seen layers expanded beyond 7 in routing reference material; ever heard of layer 2.5 (mpls)?

While this is definitely subjective, 4-layers is WRONG.

avatar

alanmc76

It never ceases to amaze me how many people can spout off the layers of the OSI reference model, yet have absolutely no idea how it relates to actual networking.  Those who try to prove others wrong by citing OSI layers generally end up making fools of themselves.  Books and certs are great, but until you have actual real-world experience and knowledge this is only theory.

The OSI model is not a protocol stack.  It is a common reference model developed to describe general networking and includes all different protocols - open and vendor specific.  TCP/IP on the other hand, is a specific protocol stack, which has only 4 layers.  Thus, the article, lacking as it is, is not wrong.

There is a world of network cowboys out there, but painfully few network marshalls to keep them from falling off their horses and hurting themselves.

 _________________________________________

-- "What am I, MacGyver? Fix it with what?"--

 

avatar

ben.albee

The 4-layers aren't wrong...its called the TCP/IP model or protocal. Which has only 4 not like the OSI stack which uses 7. It combinds Application, Presentation, and Session in to the Application layer then Data-link and Physical in the Network Interface Layer. So I dont see how this is subjective and its diffently not wrong. Crappy article none the less but still the layers are right.

avatar

BestUsernameEver

There are three ranges set aside for private IPv4 addresses - one for each class - as defined by RFC1918.

class A:  10.0.0.0 – 10.255.255.255

class B:  172.16.0.0 – 172.31.255.255

class C:  192.168.0.0 – 192.168.255.255

 Check out RFC 1918 here: http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc1918

 

 

avatar

aaronj2906

Look into CIDR addressing. Most companies do this now instead of sticking with classes. It is very common to see a network set up as 10.X.X.X/24.

Log in to MaximumPC directly or log in using Facebook

Forgot your username or password?
Click here for help.

Login with Facebook
Log in using Facebook to share comments and articles easily with your Facebook feed.