Super Size Me: 16 Massive and Mini Computers

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aleksandar

Aren't that solar panels on image #4?

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dramsey

The Apple I was delivered as a naked circuit board; the wooden case shown in your image was built by whomever owned that particular version. You also had to provide your own power supply, keyboard, and monitor.

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Belboz99

SETI@Home != Folding@Home!!!

Most of what you're describing is Folding@Home, a project out of Stanford University.

Seriously, someone should get shot for mangling their facts like this! 

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roadshow41

SETI@ and Folding@ are completley different.  SETI is based at UC Berkley and is exactly what the author describes, a distrubuted computing platform that searches for ET.  Folding@ is indeed based at Stanford, but uses the idle cycles to run protein folding simulations in hopes of discovering potential disease treatements.  Same basic idea, completely different applications.  So ... before you go all postal on the MPC staff, set the phasers back to stun and do a little fact checking of your own there skippy.

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the_geekboy

The author specifically introduces folding... which refers to the Protein folding calculations that Folding@Home does -- then concludes that this is what SETI@Home is doing. He seems to imply that "Folding" describes that style of distributed computing, when it is definitely not so. I'm with Belboz99 on this one. There's some crossed wires here.

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TheMurph

I agree here.  The word "folding" specifically relates to the concept of protein folding, which is what the distributed software platform "Folding@Home" analyzes, but is in no way synonmous with the act of distributed computing for some greater purpose.

In other words, Seti doesn't "fold."  Proteins "fold."  Mixed wires, indeed.

http://www.maximumpc.com/article/features/maximum_interview_science_behind_folding_home5132

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nedwards

Belboz99 et al: you are correct. Seti doesn't fold. I've fixed the slide. 

 

Nobody's getting shot, though. That seems a little harsh.

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b_c_pc

I don' t think the circa 2000 Ericsson R380 was the first smartphone.  I think it might have been the circa 1995/1996 Nokia 9000 running the GEOS operating system.

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AETAaAS

Holy hell, that @Tokyo hallway is quite striking. You almost expect a computerised voice from above to say; "Hello and welcome to the Enrichment Center"

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praetor_alpha

It needs to have white floors, walls, and ceilings, and I will freak out.

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