Raspberry Pi vs. Intel NUC

17

Comments

+ Add a Comment
avatar

ghost30ghost

The 2 mini computers are not in the same class of performance.The latest NUC powered by I3 processor have a good performance score,and could be used for more then home multimedia.I presented the performances ,and also pro vs cons her :
http://gizpoint.com/new-intel-computer-nuc-small-desktop-review/
and I came to the conclusion that NUC could be your portable every computer with no loss on average performance.
Raspberry Pi performance is really low,and I don't know for what segment is the product intended.

avatar

meachamrob

I've designed this home server,

http://www.catalystwebdesigns.com/blog/dream-computer-build-custom-home-server-with-windows-server-2012-and-ubuntu-linux/

I've heard of Budget Raspberry Pi Home Server Builds and will have to do a piece on building one soon. Sounds very interesting. Check them out here.

Non affiliated links.

http://www.raspberrypi.org/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?t=23629&p=235256

avatar

vrmlbasic

Round 2 says that it is about pricing but the text only talks about a vague comparison between power consumption, with no direct mention of price therein.

What's up with that?

avatar

stradric

The NUC is definitely a better competitor to a Mac Mini than a RasPi. That would be a much more interesting article.

avatar

nHeroGo

Is now a good time for the Crysis joke?

avatar

Opm2

How about a Pi vs arduino faceoff?

avatar

gedtn

Apples and oranges really. Comparisons should begin with need. Typical IT focus to forget that purpose is the starting point.

For those that doubt the usefulness of Raspberry Pis, I have just replaced an Atom/ION MythTV frontend (original cost > $400) with a RPi running XBian/XBMC (total cost around $60). One runs 35 watts, the other 3-4 (high power costs at home mean the Pi will pay for itself in 2-3 years in power savings alone)

I have another 2 Pis up and running. One monitors and logs output from a solar inverter and the other the same for a weather station. And these uses took no imagination.

For the average consumer the NUC is the obvious choice. For the tinker with a purpose, and a budget, the Raspberry PI is most likely the best choice.

avatar

AETAaAS

Coming up next; Maximum PC compares a Sandisk Cruzer 32GB USB against the Samsung 840 Pro 256GB. Why? Because they are both storage devices and screw the price difference. :p

Also; Intel NUC vs Raspberry Pi vs Zero Point. :D

avatar

lindethier

I like the review, good to see a run down between the two. I can't help wanting to pickup a Pi just because it is so cheap. Don't have a use for it, just want it.

avatar

Xenite

/facepalm

Seriously guys, first you put a AMD machine up against a $8,000 boutique PC and talk about how it gets crushed.

Now you display a $35 DIY kit to a $300+ Intel system.

You guys have lost all sense of credibility.

avatar

Sirius

Uhm.... the zero point system they use for testing isn't an $8000 boutique PC.

avatar

AFDozerman

Still, what is it, like 2500?

avatar

jgottberg

Being that they don't even share a common architecture (x86, RISC, etc..), the only thing they have in common is size... And that would be like comparing a lime to a orange cutie. Both about the same size but used in entirely different ways.

avatar

PCWolf

Nice. But after reading this, I would choose Intel’s Next Unit of Computing (NUC). My reasons:

Has an Enclosure.
Supports Standard Notebook Ram.
2 Mini PCI Express slots to run an mSATA SSD & Wifi Card.
HDMI Ports.
Can actually run Windows 7.

The Raspberry Pi is too low-powered for any practical consumer use, But Intels NUC is perfect for a micro Media Center.

avatar

Caboose

Then you've completely missed the purpose of the Pi.

avatar

praetor_alpha

Raspberry Pi Model B now comes with 512 MB RAM.

I got a Pi about 6 weeks ago, but haven't a clue about what to use it for.

avatar

AFDozerman

Like you said, kind of a pointless comparison, but the rundown is still appreciated. Nice review.

Log in to MaximumPC directly or log in using Facebook

Forgot your username or password?
Click here for help.

Login with Facebook
Log in using Facebook to share comments and articles easily with your Facebook feed.