Old School Monday: RAM Explained

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CalDrumr

EDO RAM is growing in popularity.  Hahaha.  Nice.  I love reading some of these old ads, papers, and reviews.  It's like a snap shot of the technological past.

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szore

Please tell me why we need SATA interface with 3 or 6 GB/S when the freaking HD can only read at around 250 / 300 meg/s?

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CHR15x94

SATA (and most other standards, companies, etc.) often express their speeds in bits, rather than bytes (Lower case b = bits, upper case = bytes). 1Byte = 8bits. This makes their speeds look much better at first glance than they actually are.

So SATA 3 (runs at 6Gb/s) actually transfers at ~750MB/s.

And as illusionslayer mentioned, SSDs are getting stupid fast.

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szore

Thanx for pointing out the obvious. But it still seems like too much. Is there any benefit to 6gbs? I have a 6gb/s drive and it doesent run any faster. So the question still remains. Its hype, isn't it? (Until SSD's get faster).

 

Thanx.

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DDRDiesel

Certain SSD's have already been reaching speeds of up to 500MB/s (5gb/s) on a SATA 3 (6gb/s) interface (Reference the OCZ Vertex/Solid/Agility 3 series).  if you have the necessary hardware, you can take advantage of these speeds at a relatively low(er) price than what they used to cost

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CHR15x94

Yeah, pretty much. Unless you have a very high end SSD (one that reads at over 350MB/s or so), there's no benefit. But waiting until drive speeds exceed their interface doesn't work. Better off preparing for things to come.

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illusionslayer

SSDs are aproaching gB/s ranges rapidly.

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Timmmer

I would like to have a better understanding of how commands issued to the PC are interpreted so that actions take place in the proper component.  For example, the proper video goes to the video card (GPU), the proper commands generate sound from the soundcard, the CPU computes the proper instruction etc.  How does the CPU know which part of the equation belongs to it to accomplish vs the GPU.

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CHR15x94

Timmmer, it's mainly controlled by the programmer. They have to keep track of what is CPU code, GPU code, data, etc. If the programmer tells the CPU to jump into a region filled with data or GPU code, the CPU will do just that. It won't be pretty but the CPU will do what it's told, it has little or no extra logic.

BUT, more modern CPU architectures often allow memory to be divided into code or data. x86, PowerPC, etc., divide their memory into "segments" (chunks of memory, basically) and will have the CPU and MMU (memory management unit) track down if the CPU tries to execute code from a data segment. If it does, an exception will be thrown, the CPU will stop executing the code it was trying to execute (the code that tried to run "code" in a data segment), and will jump to an exception handler (code to deal with the error).

Hopefully that helps answer your question. :D I'd be happy to answer anymore.

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Timmmer

Thanks CHR15x94, you just reminded me of what it's like to be the average user of a computer again  =).  I know how my mother feels now when I am rattling off how to recover a file she deleted like it is common knowledge. 

It always amazes me that for all that I know about computers, for all that I have learned, there is still so much more that I don't know.   

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CHR15x94

"The more you know, the more you realize you don't know."

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Thumper092486

More info on the inner workings on the PSU, CPU, GPU would be awesome!

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szore

How about a white paper on the internet in general? Its all voodoo to me...

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vortX

.

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The_Dez

so.... magic, right?

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MattyMattMatt

Electricity is sort of like magic.

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Kinetic

Technically sorcery.

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vortX

OpenSorcery

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kiaghi7

She's a witch! BURN HER!!!

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