Maximum PC Gets Screwed So You Don't Have To: Ultimate Screwdriver Review Roundup

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Carey934

Why read when you can see them in action, demonstrating their benefits and potential issues:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zFjRt0nVSjo

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TomHill

ya i agreed with your thought, a slight effort can change the whole thing, i have built my PC myself, but i also got help from <a href="http://www.rexcrystal.co.uk/">Cordless Tools</a> vendor, we have to be a bit innovative, rest if fine. You would be amazed to know a specialized tool box for PC building has evolved.

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da_samman

I've been to the MegaPro site, it reads like their products are only meant for stores and distributors.  I don't see where or how you can order just one screwdriver with  the bits you want. 

Sincerely yours, from Fort Campbell, KY,

SGT Samuel E. McClard II

Life's a journey, enjoy the ride!!

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rhapdog

I've been working on PCs since the early '80s.  The power screwdrivers get my vote for very good reasons...

 #1, a good one will have a torque setting.

#2, when handling large orders and building multiple PCs, you get the job done faster.  That saves money.

#3, I have carpel tunnel, and it comes down to a choice:  Use the manual screwdriver and be in pain, or use a power screwdriver and work for days with no problems.

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markmazoo2

Hi  Where can you buy the x treme flaming handle screwdriver. I can't find it at sears.com or in my local sears store.

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s3th

Im sorry editor, but that is the gayest Catch Phrase ever. Lol

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wicked72

Snap on is the only way to go.

they are made in the USA and are made to Phillips paten specs and will not strip out cheep screws.

http://buy1.snapon.com/catalog/item.asp?P65=&tool=all&item_ID=75285&group_ID=19796&store=snapon-store&dir=catalog

 

 

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shotouthood

http://www.cpomilwaukee.com/screwdrivers/cordless_screwdrivers/6546-6.html

 

This thing is awesome.  I thought all the other electrics were too bulky.  This thing is just perfect for tight spaces.  It also has a torque setting.  Very bitchin tool....

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SIDgone

I own a simple 6 in 1 screwdriver I bough for $5 or $7 at a hardware store. When you remove the handle the shaft holds one double end tip at each end (4 total) and when you remove the tips you have 2 nut drivers - hence 6 in 1. One nut driver fits perfectly the common computer case screw. One of the best features is that I can loosen a screw with the handle on but then remove the handle and "spin" the shaft (between thumb and index finger) and have to screw out (or in) in 2 SECONDS. Frequently I don't even need to use the handle at all.
The tips are magnetized, I use the large Phillips on most desktop cases while the small Phillips works on many laptop screws. The only thing I could ask for is little less play between the removable handle and the shaft and some kind of texturing on the shaft to reduce slipping when turning it by hand.

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B-sh

i find it's the perfect screwdriver sturdy comfortable and if the client gets outa hand you can bludgeon them with it.  just magantize the shaft or bit and all is well in the world

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guitronics

 

 

Magnetic tips on screwdrivers do not hurt motherboards, the static discharge from your body to the mobo,RAM,HDD,Cards, and/or other peripherals via the metal screwdriver shaft - or - your finger;will fry parts.

 

Always unplug the Computer! Touch the Aluminum chassis (a screw, or bare metal) continuously!

 

Magnetics got the bad name 'cause they would erase parts of Floppy Disks (remember those?).

 

 

It's a free country as long as you pay your own way.

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nopcbs

The very best ratcheting, magnetic-tip screwdrivers with in-handle bit storage were the two WorkForce models sold at Home Depot until very recently for $4 and $7 (short and long model).

These things are awesome. Easy to use, reliable, and very cheap. All the bits in the handle you could possably want. I bought six! Had them everywhere.

So, of course, Home Depot stopped selling them! People in the store say thet they will have them for Christmas, again. If true, get them. They are the best.

As for a cordless lithium battery screw driver, Menards sells a clutchless pistol grip model (house brand) that is pretty darn good and sells for about $25 with bits.  

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paidhima

I'll give my vote for the Snap-On ratcheting screwdriver.  I have the rubber grip model, and it's utterly fantastic.  The ratchet is clean and strong, the shaft has almost no wobble at all, and the entire thing feels about as solid as a screwdriver gets.  It's not cheap, but the lifetime warranty and outstanding craftsmanship is totally worth it.

Incidentally, several years ago MaximumPC did a piece on the Ultimate PC Toolkit, giving their suggestions for the best hardware tools.  The Snap-On ratcheting screwdriver was included in that kit.  I wonder why they didn't include it in this line-up.

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flashlightlens

If a ratchet is needed, Snapon.

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thomspengler

Looks like you didn't ask many Pro's what they use.

If you'd ever used one of these you certainly wouldn't have left it off the list.
I demand a screwdriver re-evaluation  #;^)

  1. MegaPro can be customized (Specialized bits can be ordered)
    to make exactly the configuration you need
  2. Bits are double-ended, to maximize available tips
  3. Bits store inside the handle - no exteraneous box or flakey rubber-ring
    bit storage to be misplaced or lost under the seat of your car
  4. Truely the best screwdriver I ever owned - that and a Lithium powered driver
The only downside is that they're hard to find, but this is no problemo on the WWW.
Check it out...

PS - I have no affiliation with them, just like the prouct

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GPFontaine

I liked the idea of the article but I have two problems with it.

 The first and most important is that no conclusion was given.  With 26 products I would like a summary at the beginning or end.

And second is the layout.  Seven pages with the navigation at the bottom of the article is a pain.

 

I suppose a last comment is that I wish that this content were in the magazine and not a blog.

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jlh304

Check out Snap-on Tools. Not only do they have a torque screwdriver they have the best screwdrivers money can buy. They have small ratcheting screwdrives you can change the blades on. A nice electronics set. Screwdrives you can change the bits... the list just goes on and on. They are the best.

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shawn Harris

Ihave just read your article about  " the so called best screw drivers", you might want to checkout  a web site www.snapon.com. This is where you will find professional top of the line screwdrivers, with magnetic interchangable bits of all different shapes and sizes. As well as racheting screwdrivers that can turn and operate at different angles. These screwdrivers  are the BEST BAR NONE.

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bugfreezer

Megapro should be worhty of consideration - They have a better than average bit holding mechanism, and the guy even designed a custom bit - a 5mm and 3/16" hex driver bit to screw down mobo standoffs and peripheral cable connector screws.

They offer ratcheting and non-ratcheting models - here is a link:

http://www.megapro.net/products/index.php

I owe that guy...

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da_samman

How do I order just 1?  Their catalog seems geared towards resellers, not individual purchasers. 

Sincerely yours, from FOB Striker, Iraq,

SGT Samuel E. McClard II

Life's a journey, enjoy the ride!!

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Keith E. Whisman

How about a screw driver with a torque setting that won't let you over tighten screws in aluminum cases. How many times have you stripped the screw hole trying to screw in a new sound card? I did it alot and while I was working at Kodak configuring their computers and doing tech support on TI laptops and the first generation Palm Pilots. I always carried screws that were a size larger than standard because I stripped out a couple pc's everyday.

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Paul_Lilly

Sounds like you need to spend less time at the gym! :P

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DarkHelmet

Seriously, I feel naked without this thing:

Victorinox Cybertool 34

I love the interchangable heads, they give you several sizes of phillips, a slotted, and several hex heads.
I rarely find anything electronic, PC, laptop, or otherwise, that I cannot take apart and put back together with this thing.
-Helmet 
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da_samman

Sorry, but the idea of working on a PC with a Swiss Army Knife is not that endearing to me.  It looks like keeping a good grip on this would be painful.

Sincerely yours, from FOB Striker, Iraq,

SGT Samuel E. McClard II

Life's a journey, enjoy the ride!!

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brokenmoth08

sounds cool, where and how much?

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drfeelmegood

The one screwdriver I can't be without is here: http://www.picquic.com/bro-english.html They have several very good versions. Might want to check it out.

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ghot

...an 8 page review of ....screwdrivers.....lol.....send me some of whatever you're smoking...please.   Are the lab fumes gettin to you guys?  I'm sitting here truly lmao at this article...thank you for the good hearty laugh!  The more I think about this article the more I laugh...thank you again...Jay Leno  look out, maximum PC is after your' job  :)

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da_samman

In truth, if you think about it, this article can be very handy for true enthusiasts who build their own rigs. Not all screwdrivers are created equal.

Sincerely yours, from FOB Striker, Iraq,

SGT Samuel E. McClard II

Life's a journey, enjoy the ride!!

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yr

Maybe I missed something? In MPC April 2006 pg42 (build a laptop) Gordon recommends using WIHA presicion screwdrivers. I personally own a number of screwdrivers from WIHA (based on this recommedation) and find them of excellent quality and easy to use. Pair it with a magnetizer/demagnetizer for about 10 bucks and you need no more. They even have several types of screwdrivers; ratchet, preseicion, comfort, etc.

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G White

I dare to be a little different. I usually buy a good 6 in 1 or 9 in 1 screwdriver with generic plastic handle. I take it back to the woodworking shop and cut the plastic handle off the steel bore guide then proceed to turn a custom wood handle with brass ferrel. My go to driver is turned from cherry.

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brokenmoth08

0.0 That is so awesome.

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yogurt80

Here's the screwdriver I prefer: http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2062778&cp=&sr=1&kw=screwdriver&origkw=Screwdriver&pg=2&parentPage=search

It's nice because it's small and compact, but what they don't tell you here is that the shaft acctually extends, basically doubling the length of your driver for hard- to - reach places (like, behind your PSU).  And, it all comes in a nice, locking case. Also, it comes with that tiny torx bit for cell phones (nice).                 

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fake gordon mah ung

He just said shaft and extend in the same sentence...

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da_samman

Thank you,  Beavis and Butthead. 

Sincerely yours, from Fort Campbell, KY,

SGT Samuel E. McClard II

Life's a journey, enjoy the ride!!

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yogurt80

I knew someone would catch that...

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akilazung

I think so

sears

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ferds7

Once again, computers (or something that has to do with computers) prevents me from getting scr....

err.. good article :) I was actually wishing one would come out on this very subject!

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BizSAR

Unlike other reviews, you didn't include a conclusion that includes which one or ones were the best, in your opinion. Granted, it's an opinion, but so are a lot of your reviews.

~BizSAR

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rayatwork05

WOW, i would never use ANY of these.  they are not even designed for working on/in computer systems.  like the other guy said, Snap-On electric is like 12" long and magnetic. cant go wrong with that.

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yogurt80

Yeah, I'm sure those guys at MPC who built all those awesome systems have no clue when it comes down to the basics such as screwdrivers.  Geez.

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Tekzel

If they didn't include any of the Snapon screwdrivers in their review, they completely missed the boat.  Any geek in the know either uses one or is too cheap to buy a top quality tool.  I have several, the oldest is 10 years old and still works like new.

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austin

This is an awesome idea. Though sadly I doubt something like this could be done that would appeal to minimalists or people like me who like the Unix philosphy ("Do one thing, do it well."). I have no interest in all these multi-bit ratcheting gadgets. I just want a good quality plain ol' phillips screwdriver. Fortunately for me I stumbled across one at a gas station in the middle of nowhere when I needed to buy a screwdiver to fix the mirror on a moving van. It has just the right shape to allow it to work very well with just about any kind of phillips screw regardless of size. It's unbelievably better than any other phillips screwdriver I've ever used. So for now I use it for all my computer work and I'm happy--until some day when I lose it or someone takes it or I can't find it. Then I don't know what I'll do. I'll have to either go back to using crappy screwdrivers or start a quest to find a new one.

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cjrlauve

Great article.  I periodically have searched for recommendations on this topic to no avail.  Thanks for providing a resource.  But, the layout of your article makes it almost unreadable.  Do we really need to scan 7 pages for a bottom line?  Put a summary somewhere (preferably on page 1)!

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SysAnalyst

I know you guys used/reviewed the Snap-On SSDMR4B (in orange) at some point.  This ratcheting, multiple bit driver is exactly what I use every day for PC repair.  Even at close to $60, I wouldn't hesitate to buy another for home.

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nsvander

You guys never enven mentioned the Snap-on electric screw driver model CTS561.  Evey tech at my work has one of these, and they are the greatest.  Allows one handed operation, and they are low torque so you dont strip the heads off.  Plus with the battery pack at 90* to the head, they can get into the tightest of places.

 

http://buy1.snapon.com/catalog/item.asp?P65=&tool=all&item_ID=76628&group_ID=19915&store=snapon-store&dir=catalog

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samduhman

You nerds. You suck so bad. Now you have me wanting to go buy a sweet screwdriver with interchangable bits.

So after I scanned a dozen pages you didn't tell us which was the best. So how can I tell which one will look most rad at the LAN parties? ;)

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Talcum X

 There is no 'all in one' solution when building a PC.  Cant use a huge battery powered driver in tight areas and when you drop your screw in the sea of ICs and memory chips on the MoBo, they usually dont like the presence of magnetic objects.  And alwasy work witht the power off and unplugged.  Unlike the old AT days, power is still present on modern ATX systems.

***********

Every morning is the dawn of a new error.

"In Ireland, there are more drunks per capita than people."  -  Peter Griffin

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Tekzel

I disagree with just about every part of your post, I have been a bench tech for probably 15 years and find that the miniscule magnetic field on a magnetic screwdriver has absolutely zero affect on any part of the PC.  I also work on them plugged in all the time, to keep them grounded.  I generally unplug the power after touching the chassis to discharge only when I am going to pull out the memory, but only sometimes.  Know how many motherboards, sticks of memory, or any other component I have damaged in all that time?  0.  Thats right, zero.  Nil. 

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knexkid

This was good for a lol!  I was a little disappointed that you didn't have a number rating after each screw driver!  Either way, its great to see the things reviewed that we would never really consider part of our PCs.  Try posting an article like this in a Mac lovers site and they'd freak out!

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Skiplives

Some Mac owners would appriciate it.  I just changed the HDD on my G5 iMac, which is harder than you'd think, they really wedge it in there. 

I am not a fan of all in ones.  And since I am not a system builder and not interested in speed, I don't use my electric driver on my computer.  I have a nice set of screwdrivers that are the right size, and I use the right tool for the job.

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