How the Police Get Your Phone Records

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iceek6AePa

Criminalization may provide future harm-reduction at least to the outside population, assuming those shamed or incarcerated or otherwise restrained for committing crimes start out more prone to criminal behaviour. Thanks.
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Philips

Records are always at reach. Police evidence are acquirable if phone is the device used. Data is consistent.

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Philips

Nobody exits a solid evidence. If caught, and an excellent proof is shown, it shall prevail. I enjoyed reading this article about evidence.

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Bogdan

The police knows every thing about us.. they can locate us very fast if we use a cell phone. So if you have done some bad things and the police is after you, avoid cell phones :))

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Cazare Predeal

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EdnaM

Conducting a search through the phone records of an individual or through the log of various telephone service providers was considered to be a breach in privacy until some years ago. But it is not so anymore. The law enforcement agencies across the nations can now have access to phone records courtesy the US Patriotic act signed by President Bush on October 26, 2001. Since the law now considers domestic terrorism to be as serious a threat to the nation as the international terrorism, the law enforcement agencies can now request a background check on the phone records from all telephone service providers as well as the details of other means of communication.

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thetechchild

This is not the fault of the technology itself -- and it *is* most definitely an issue. Not because of the possibility, but because of the likelihood and lack of restrictions. The general population (including lawmakers, lawyers, politicians, etc.) is relatively tech-ignorant. This is the main issue, because in a world where technology is on the rise, those who make decisions for our nation are out of touch with the usage of tech. Not only this, but they mostly ignore the opinion of the international meritocracy that is the internet unless crimes are committed. Further, when crimes are committed for some purpose (and I'm not saying they should be) the govt. and media blame only the perpetrator, and never take a look at the underlying cause (generally, perceived corruption).

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SirBC

In Michigan the police have the right to stop you in your car, take your phone, use a "special" device to download all info from your phone including contacts, GPS data, text messages, emails, photos, etc... Pretty much the whole kit and kaboodle. No court order necessary. No probable cause neccesary.

 

http://investmentwatchblog.com/report-michigan-police-download-cell-phone-data-during-routine-motorist-stops/

 

 

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big_montana

Just because Michigan STate Police own a device that can scan you rphone, does not mean you have to give them your phone, or for that matter is legal what they are doing. This falls under probable cause, and unreasonable search and seizure. Why else would they not be turning over the information the ACLU requested in 2008? Because they know what they are doing is illegal.

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I Jedi

The truth is that technology is greatly allowing others to look into our lives, even without our knowing. The courts may have to try and follow the rule of law, but your everyday criminal hacker doesn't care about your rights. Being on the "grid" as it is makes all of us more easily vulnerable to attack and fraud. With a tech-savvy enough boyfriend or girlfriend, we can now truly "track" where our loved ones are going everystep of the way. There are even some applications, which allow people to record phone calls. Imagine your loved one recording all your conversations on your phone for them to hear later!

Point and being, as we embrace technology, we are allowing ourselves to be more easily exposed for who we are and what we do. Granted, not all of us here are running out in the middle of the night to rob Ms. Daisy, or most of us aren't cheating on our loved ones; however, aren't we all granted to privacy? With that said, is technology something we really should so easily adopt?

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