Game Theory: Satan's Copy Protection Scheme?

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JCCIII

Same here, especially with a game like Diablo where one likes to carry it around on a laptop, in a car, or wherever—like a book!

Record-breaking profits do not appear to be enough for these petty contemptible people, and I have purchased every Blizzard game the company has produced.

Thomas McDonald, a columnist for Maximum PC, supports this always on nonsense with the weakest of arguments. Maybe it is time for him to retire or run for senator.

Of course, id Software praises the move, oh, that company that says the future of gaming is on consoles. No wonder John Romeo is said to have left id Software because of creative differences, him wanting content, John Carmack wanting mindless splash over content.

Sincerely,
Joseph C. Carbone III
19 January 2012

hexidecimal says:
January 6, 2012 at 12:41 pm
I was really excited for this game, but with the cash market place, the always on DRM, and the inability to play without an internet connection I’ve officially given up on Diablo 3.
Especially when a game like Torchlight 2 is slated to come out around the same time, with LAN support, a 20 dollar price tag, no DRM, & members of the original Diablo team on their development team I’d much rather send my money their way.
I love you Blizzard, but you’re letting Activision [a bad word] up your games.

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RichNS70

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In the printed article you talk about the complaints regarding an active Internet connection and say, "And, seriously people: calm the hell down.  If this is the biggest problem you have, then you don't have any problems."  Maybe you just don't see other perspectives because you live a rosy life, however, I've been deployed several times to crappy places all over the world.  After 12 hours of being in the sun, dealing with moronic fools like yourself as well as the potential to be blown up, all I want to do is relax.  I'm not allowed to have beer, so my relaxation comes in the form of games.  I can remember receiving my copy of Red Alert 4 in the slow military mail, wooohoo, it is finally here.  WTF?  I have to have an Internet connection to play?  There isn't an Internet connection out here!

So before you belittle people about that complaint, open your narrow mind to other peoples perspective or just shut the hell up.

 

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ScytheNoire

Blizzard is far from the great company it once was. Corporate greed has changed them. You can argue if it was Activision or simply success, but they are no longer all about the gamers, but instead all about the share holders. Screw Wall Street, keep them out of my gaming.

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Athlonite

for the simple fact of having to have an online BB connection alone to even play single player is putting me off from buying this game and I liked and still play Diablo II on win7 x64

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Danthrax66

You shouldn't be writing for MaximumPC. Your rebuttals to the criticisms are a joke, you provide no numbers to the claim of piracy other than a rough estimate of how much they pay to make sure it doesn't happen. Remember when the RIAA was spending tens of millions of dollars to recover in court about a million? Yeah, it didn't make sense because piracy isn't that big of a deal. As for the argument about mods, I guess you have never played a Valve game because most of their games have thrived and remained in vogue because of the mods. Not to mention allowing people to create mods reveals new talent to hire as a programmer or designer, or it can spawn a brand new game (Counter Strike). And it really seems like you were in fact "bought off" by Blizzard when you come out of no where with claims that the game isn't good. You have about as much journalistic talent as a teenager writing for his high school paper. Also pro-tip never respond to comments with an entirely new article it makes you look like a child.

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Archangel1976

Man.... I know I've read this article before somewhere.......

 

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Archangel1976

www.stateofplayblog.com/2011/09/diablo-is-in-details.html

 I know I've read it somewhere else besides here. I think it was ArsTechnica. I'll find it and post. Just astonished that you want to recycle your old work there Tom.

 

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bloodgain

Wow. He basically smack-talks about the MaxPC forums in that article, too. He all but says, "Don't bother with the MaxPC forums, because all they do is bitch and moan over there."

I have to agree with some of the other posters, too. I've read very few of Mr. McDonald's column articles in the magazine that I thought were very insightful or informative. He's out of touch with actual gamers, and I suspect that he's really more of a "sometimes" gamer at this point except when he's asked to review a game. It just seems like his articles are in MaximumPC just because they have been for so long, and most of them feel phoned-in.

Maybe it's time to let Mr. Grayson take over the monthly gaming commentary column, and give Mr. McDonald his gold watch, wishing him well over at Games Magazine and Ars Technica.

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rabidoyster

While the trolls that only throw insults don't deserve a response, it's unfortunate that you respond to the "reasonable commentary" with sarcasm and snark. 

As to your second point in particular, it's absolutely within a developer and/or publisher's rights to allow or prevent modding. It's also within the rights of the consumer to desire modding compatibility. Your lack of interest in an open modding community for the game ought not be grounds for dismissing the pleas of those that have said interest. I generally look to the enthusiast press to represent the voice of the consumer as much as possible. Certainly Blizzard has enough PR people that it's not necessary for you to use your platform to dismiss the concerns of gamers by acknowledging Blizzard's right to do whatever it wants to make money. 

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rabidoyster

I don't even plan on playing Diablo III, I don't like the games that much either, but the smug tone of this article towards concerned consumers was off-putting enough that I felt compelled to respond. If this was a response to the angry fire-breathing trolls, then perhaps next time, resist that urge. 

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Bad Kharma

There was a time, when you didn't like the way a company treated you, you voted with your money and found an alternative. Today, we all seem to have ADD and we must have the latest shiny bit. If you don't like the way that gaming companies treat you, walk away. If everyone had the sefl-control to do this, these companies would get the idea.

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GreenComp

I will never going to read another of your articles.

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Bad Kharma

When a company starts to treat all its customers as criminals, of course, the customers are going to get extremely irritated. It would be like going to the bank to get your money and provide DNA and retinal scans and the bank claiming that your are trying to stea their money.

 

Software piracy is a problem but penalizing all your customers isn't the way of correcting it. These companies should be firing their lawyers and hiring brighter minds to correct the problem. When you start punishing your customers, the customers start to get the idea that, if they are going to be punished, they may as well participate in the activity.

 

 

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mattman059

Okay..so i could care less about his opinion about the DRM or the game...so whatever..THIS!...this is what made me angry

"Since first writing about Diablo III, I’ve put several hours into the beta" 

That's right...keep bragging. 

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Weedkillers

1.  Steam and many others already use simmiler Stuff  not saying DRM is right its just going to happen, so long as its not installing rootkits or crippling and crashing the PC its not to bad on the whole.

2. Someone will crack it just like steam for playing offline etc just you will probably be limited to closed servers or local LAN  same as steam(and hence why number 1 wont be that bad for thosue that realy need LAN etc)

 

Personaly i played diablo 1 & 2 lan based far more social m8's round lot of beers etc good fun and you could pick it up and put it down unlike a wow raid but this is also the same way i played SC.

Now for SC2 i have to be online to play with my m8's even on a lan same as all my steam games

 

I dont have to like it i dont have to much choice but what i can do is pay £30 for the game and get a crack for it if i have to to play on LAN

 

Mabye it shouldnt be that way but it is, il settle for no rootkits, crashes, compatibility issues with the client or other games. 

How many people hear have SKY? 

Thats well unfair you need to pay for sky sports etc even when you have normal sky !!!! but you can still get cracked cards for that too

 

It just depends how far you want to go

 

One other mention there earn actual money auction house would be pretty pointless if you could just hack your char and clone 900000 items to sell

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Engelsstaub

Where's Nimrod? I figured he'd be along by now :P

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Biceps

Right!??  Was actually wondering the same thing :)

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Carlidan

Yeah was waiting for him to bitch about something.

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Biceps

Fantastic apology.  You show the same level of understanding of the complaints that readers posted on your last article that Bloomberg shows for the underlying issues driving the 99% movement in NYC. Namely, none.

Your first article was glib, flippant and basically told people who had an issue with DRM that they shouldn't have a problem because there are more important things to worry about.  Your follow-up  article shows a total lack of empathy for those who are (unlike you) actually affected by the always-on DRM scheme, then proceeds to be even more glib and flippant than the first. While you assert that gaming is not the most serious of subjects, you somehow manage to get paid for writing about it, then then follow up by essentially telling anyone who replies to your corporate dick-riding that they are a loser for watching puppy videos.  Really charming and even more productive.

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stradric

Blizzard's decision here has never bothered me simply because it's not "always-on DRM".  Diablo 3 is an online game, and all online games require you to be online.  Whether or not Diablo 3 needs to be an online game is another story.

You can't please everyone, so don't try.  I respect people that stick to their own vision despite the naysayers.  Blizzard is making the game they want to make -- one that is played in an online community that deals harshly with cheaters.

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Scatter

I don't buy that arguement.  Diablo has always been a single player game which had an online OPTINON.  Of course you needed to be online to take advantage of the online OPTION part but it wasn't necessary to be online to play the single player game.  Making Diablo III as an online only game is essentially just DRM. 

 

 

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stradric

It's more than just DRM.  It's about building an online community.  It's about protecting players from hacks and cheats.  I understand that some people don't want to be part of that community, and that's fine.  It just means that Diablo 3 is not the game for them.  Hardly the end of the world...

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jnwoll

Well, sadly, you should.  When Diablo was released, players can either connect by: direct connection, modem connection, Battle.net Connection or IPX Network Connection.  Okay fine.  However, you want to compare to millions of more homes having cable/DSL connections of today to dial-up then?  Why not start an argument that when Alexander Bell created the phone, you didn't have to pay for minutes like you do today. 

I understand that it isn't necessary and I get the argument, as weak as it is, simply put the game is easier to support, as well as deliver other content and create an "online" world through their client.  If you don't want to buy it because of that fine, they lose a customer.  As a gambler though, I'm betting that those who say they won't buy it, 50% of them eventually do. 

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don2041

I agree with you about Doom 3

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Scatter

I'm curious why Blizzard is being defended from employing these forms of DRM yet UbiSoft is routinely demonized for doing essentially the same thing. 

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dgrmouse

Thomas is not, and has never been, a sound judge of anything related to video games.  Aside from his approval of the game Prototype, I can't recall ever ever ever reading a commentary that I could agree with.  This is the guy who stated that GTA should fail because it is too violent.  Thom should never, ever, ever be allowed to review or comment on the video game market.  DRM is another topic that should be left to his betters - Ms. Norton actually saw what was coming back before the DCMA, Thom isn't even able to understand what has already happened.

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std error

Maybe because Blizzard makes great games while Ubisoft make average games.

 

You'd be more willing to forgive your uber-hot-supermodel girlfriend for cheating than your ordinary-run-of-mill girlfriend, right? If you break-up with the former then no more hot s.... But you can always find another of the latter.

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Scatter

My point however was that Blizzard is just as guilty as Ubisoft is and needs to be called out for it.  For us to give Blizzard a pass on this while publically shaming Ubisoft is just hypocritical.  If we accept this form of DRM from anyone it will eventually become standard across the industry. 

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Peanut Fox

I don't think it has as much to do with Blizzard, and rather more to do with the sheer fanboism of the Diablo franchise.  I look at Diablo III and all the negative press it's getting possibly helping sales from the much smaller developer's of Torchlight and Torchlight 2.

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