Game Theory: The Diablo is in the Details

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JCCIII

Same here, especially with a game like Diablo where one likes to carry it around on a laptop, in a car, or wherever—like a book!

Record-breaking profits do not appear to be enough for these petty contemptible people, and I have purchased every Blizzard game the company has produced.

Thomas McDonald, a columnist for Maximum PC, supports this always on nonsense with the weakest of arguments. Maybe it is time for him to retire or run for senator.

Of course, id Software praises the move, oh, that company that says the future of gaming is on consoles. No wonder John Romeo is said to have left id Software because of creative differences, him wanting content, John Carmack wanting mindless splash over content.

Sincerely,
Joseph C. Carbone III
19 January 2012

hexidecimal says:
January 6, 2012 at 12:41 pm
I was really excited for this game, but with the cash market place, the always on DRM, and the inability to play without an internet connection I’ve officially given up on Diablo 3.
Especially when a game like Torchlight 2 is slated to come out around the same time, with LAN support, a 20 dollar price tag, no DRM, & members of the original Diablo team on their development team I’d much rather send my money their way.
I love you Blizzard, but you’re letting Activision [a bad word] up your games.

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bling581

"I love you Blizzard, but you’re letting Activision [a bad word] up your games."

They claim that Activision leaves them alone to do their own thing, but I'm starting to wonder myself. The internet connection DRM has become a common thing so I can't really complain about that, but there's a lot of other things that make me question them. Even in WoW I noticed they really started to up in-game digital purchases and anything that would grab them more cash. I didn't play SC2 but didn't they do similar things? Adding map packs you had to buy or charging money to watch the cutscene videos?

Torchlight was great and I can't wait for 2.

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mewarmo990

Uh, what the heck?

Am I reading Op-Ed or news?

 

I'm down to buy Diablo 3. But I am really bummed that I will be unable to play it when I'm traveling (often) or somewhere without reliable internet access. I've hated this type of DRM ever since Ubisoft has been doing it with their games. It's what pushed me to purchase certain games, like Assassin's Creed Brotherhood, on the PS3 instead of my perfectly capable gaming PC.

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Jackals

ALL HAIL BLIZZARD!

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Numbnumb

There is one thing that I must say.  If I buy this game and I spend $50.00 what have I bought?  If it is another game that I can take home, load up and play whenever I want without the internet then that is my property.  If I buy this game I do not own it.  For $50 I don't own it.  Here is why.  Every time I try to get online to play it and cannot then it is not my game because I am prevented from enjoying it.  If I get on the forums and say something that upsets Blizzard and they ban me from the website then I can not play the game and I do not own it.  In both scenarios Blizzard owns all the right to the game and I cannot even get a credit back on my money.  I have absolutely no say on my money once Blizzard has it.

Nuff said.

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dstevens

50 billion a year?... dude really?

 

now why are they doing this.. 2 b stupid... they should just relesae a f2p client and sell off quest plugins and you cna buy your armor and weapons right of the "Diablo2 with some graphics upgrades"... err i mean diablo 3 store....

is it hackable... 100%..

is wow hackable? yes but the worlds are completely generated in realtime on private servers 24/7

bet this is somwhat like that but 100% less complicated or taxing on hardware...

now if your complaining... then u have a crappy connection ... or your a souless pirate that should burn in hell... according to some dumbasses.... but whatever... cause thers better games out there than this already guys.. we dont need a game for its name... go play eve, go play wow, go play eq2x, go play black prophecy, go play anything that when your playing online your playing online.... cause this game is gonna bomb anyway... look at all of the biggest in development games of all time flops... the longer thier in development the more of a fat flop they are....

stfu blizzard all your code is whack

 

nubs

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Nimrod

Deleting my comments asking why your stone walling and not replying? Really McDonald? Go fuck your self. I think its obvious you have caused lasting damage to the rep of max PC. Delete my comments if you want, it wont raise your sub numbers.

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Biceps

Nimrod, if you haven't noticed, everyone (well, most everyone here) is agreeing with you regarding the lack of validity of McD's arguments.  I don't know why you feel the need for the author to chime in and somehow acknowledge that you are, in fact, correct.  You know you are right, I know you are right, most everyone else here knows you are right.  Do you really expect Mickey D to hop on and beg your forgiveness or something?  Re-read the first line of his article... carefully... then see if you still feel the need to keep poking the dude with a stick.  

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b00tleg

As an adult, there are just to many games out there for me ever to able to play them all. Unfortunately adult responsibilities take priority. The fact that this whole DRM issue is springing up with Diablo III is more helpful then annoying. I can't control the DRM scheme they choose to go with or how its implemented in the game. I however can, as a consumer vote with my wallet and choose not to buy this game. This has two benefits, first is that it keeps the time I do have available to play games open and free for the games I do want to play. Secondly, it casts my vote as not supporting a DRM scheme that is inconvenient and invasive. Sorry Blizzard, your not getting my money.

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Nimrod

lol surppise. No respones from McDonald on any of this. He leveled obviously false and absurd claims and now hes stone walling.

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Engelsstaub

I don't think you had your juicebox this morning. I hope someone soon gives you the attention you so richly deserve.

Seriously though: you've got a bunch of people down there essentially agreeing with you. That should be enough for you to feel confident in your position.  Maybe he is a coward for not diving into a flame-war with you. Or maybe he has a family and/or people to talk to, work to do, etc. Who can know for certain?

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Nimrod

Before he deleted my comment i clarified this. McDonald has be confronted with his lies and refuses to acknolwdge them or redact them.

 

 

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Erris

Funny thing is that this will not stop pirates from pirating the game AT ALL.

Who wants to bet that less than a week after release there will be a crack that circumvents any DRM they decide to use?

 

Like with all DRM  it is only an inconvenience for the person playing the game without any cracks.

 

Oh and that $50 billion number you put in there is just retarded. Assuming all the garbage a pirate downloads is lost revenue is just stupid. Pirates grab stuff indiscriminately just because it is free. Sure, if they could not pirate at all they would have bought some of it, but it would be much, MUCH less than what they grabbed for free.

 

Yeah 95% of the software might be pirated in countries like China or Eastern Europe/Africa/S. America even, but are you telling me that the Chinese worker who gets paid $0.50/hr  will spend $700 on Photoshop if they could not pirate it, $1 for each mp3 song in their 30000 song collection they downloaded for free? A little thought should be required before people start regurgitating numbers made up by the MPIAA and RIAA.

In reality that $50 billion number will be much closer to say $1 billion and more likely much less than that even.

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bling581

"Piracy costs the software industry about $50 billion a year, plus thousands of lost jobs that could have been generated by that revenue."

I wouldn't expect Max PC to spew garbage such as this, you should know better. The figures that the entertainment industry make up are far from the actual figure and are made to try and get sympathy to their cause. They don't factor in that a lot of stuff people wouldn't ever pay for regardless, or they simply just couldn't afford it to begin with. Yet they chalk it up as lost revenue when it's not costing them any money.

I don't buy your arguement that because we play MMO's like WoW and many other games online that we shouldn't have a problem with it. Even though I know when I login WoW that if I go AFK I could die, it still sucks when it happens. Playing a single player game and losing a large chunk of time because you lost your connection in between checkpoints is unacceptable.

"Blizzard, a company with a uniformly excellent reputation for quality and customer service"

Even all the more reason why I wouldn't expect such a company to develop a preposterous DRM system.

If you don't like it don't buy it? Even if I am planning to buy a game regardless or already own it I reserve the right to voice my opinion as a consumer. How many companies have gone back on radical policies because consumers voiced their opinion? Plenty.

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Neufeldt2002

"How many companies have gone back on radical policies because consumers voiced their opinion? Plenty."

The most recent on THIS SITE, is the Onstar debacle

http://www.maximumpc.com/article/news/onstar_buckles_under_pressure_and_reverses_privacy_policy_change

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Nimrod

This is the same point i made in my post down at the bottom. Its very important to know that we have the power. Being told to sit down and shut up as Blizzard and McDdonald would like is SURE to piss of every red blooded person out there.

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NastyNorman

Those of us in the United States Military need the ability to play single player or direct connect multiplayer. All of the other jargon about DRM and only online means nothing to me. Blizzard can find a way to mitigate piracy and still offer single player. Most people want to play online however, some ppl just can't due to various reasons. While I am in the States and not deployed to God knows where, there is no issue of the online only. If I do deploy however, I will have wasted my money on a game that I cannot play for a year. If you make a great product ppl will buy it regardless. I am not like a lot of other ppl that say " I won't buy it", I will buy it. I just think Blizzard is making a mistake. If Blizzard can afford to sell DII and the expansion for $20 each and still have people play online, I don't think piracy is as big an issue as previously stated.

 

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hogkill

Clearly McDonald has never lived in the country, where the majority of people use an unstable radio internet connection.  I will not be buying the game because it will not be stable for me, which is money lost for Blizzard.

Also the industry does not lose "$50 billion a year".  If you are assuming that people who pirate games would buy them if there were no piracy options then maybe this would be the case, but there is no evidence that it is.  I postulate that the industry may be losing less than $5 billion a year because the people who are pirating these games cannot afford them or would be unwilling to pay anyways.  This is especially the case in China where you are quoting a 95% piracy rate.  You can bet your ass that these people don't have the money to purchase the software legally to begin with, so if they want to better themselves by using illegal software I don't see the problem.  The companies making the software will not be taking a hit since the "pirates" can't afford it anyhow.

Some of the comments here make better articles than this tripe.

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gothliciouz

wait what?....is this maximum pc or blizzard website?

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Xessive

I agree 100% that Blizzard have every right to protect their intellectual property, I won't argue that. The question of online-at-all times games is convenience and necessity.

 

Is it really necessary for a singleplayer experience to require an active internet connection for no reason other than to monitor the legitimate players? I don't think so. As a frequent traveler its highly inconvenient (an implausible) to be connected at all times.

 

I've been a fan of Blizzard's work for years, particularly the Diablo series. I don't play MMOs, they're not convenient for someone on-the-go since I can't always guarantee a reliable internet connection. I don't like World of WarCraft and its ilk. Blizzard's brilliance, for me, was in their art and games before WoW. Diablo is not a "Massive Multiplayer Online" game so I don't expect to require an internet connection for singleplayer. Multiplayer is a lot of fun and makes sense to require an internet connection, though let's not forget the glaring absence of LAN multiplayer.

 

It's sad that it has come to this point but Blizzard have made it clear that they don't want players like me. They want WoW players; MMO players who already used to the online-only model; that's where the money is after all. All that's left is for the rest of us to understand is that Diablo III is not a traditional Diablo game, it's a Diablo-themed MMO-modelled experiment aimed at setting the trend for the next generation of Blizzard products.

 

What's the reason for all this? Security. At what cost? Personal freedom. That applies to every field of life: there's always a balance tossing between security and liberty. "Draconian" and "Orwellian" are hilariously appropriate terms.

 

Will I buy Diablo III? Sadly, no. The cost to personal freedom is too big for my taste. I prefer to play games that I pay for at my leisure and convenience; they are games after all and meant to be enjoyed. Aside from that, it's not a game I expect to play much since I'm not a fan of MMOs in general, and this seems to be the direction Blizzard are taking the franchise. If it was convenient to play the singleplayer I might have reconsidered.

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rebloka

I get that Blizzard is trying to protect their software but what about those who dont have an Internet connection always available!

Who doesn't have Internet in this day and age you ask?

US Soldiers serving in Iraq and Afghanistan!  I am one of those soldiers.  I am able to purchase internet in my room (extrememly unreliable internet) but there are MANY who cant. Especially in austere locations.

Many soldiers rely on gaimng as a stress relief from the rigors of the war and its a travisty that they will be left out of this game and others.

 

 

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Ridnarhtim

1) No one has a problem with being to play online without a monthly fee. Just the fact that there is no option to play offline.

2) This kind of measure does not stop piracy. If anything, it encourages it. Look at any thread anywhere about this topic, and you'll find people stating that, unless Blizzard change this, they're waiting for a cracked version that lets them play offline. And although I'm sure they'll sell millions of copies anyway, I'm certainly not buying it.

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noobstix

I remember a whole slew of people that lost their save games from Ubisoft's DRM.  Same thing will definitely happen here with Diablo III.  No matter how hard Blizzard will try to iron out the system, someone out there will still end up losing precious hours of gameplay simply because of a random disconnect from the servers (caused by either a power outage, sudden server outage, or an ISP dicking around with the service).  If anything, most of the profit from this game will be if (or when) they release it on console.  I've played various MMOs and always wanted to go back to playing single-player offline simply because I don't have to worry about server troubles.  Also, I wouldn't have to worry about dealing with spammers and scammers or anything else that can deter me away from playing the game.  Well, at least my $50 (maybe $60) will go towards a game that doesn't require me being online to play single-player.

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Sweeney

T. Liam, come on now. This is literally the worst article you have ever written, and I've been reading you for at least a decade.

The difference between WoW and Diablo 3 in regards to an 'always-online' necessity are so basic and fundamental that I am, for the first time in my life, seriously questioning your journalistic integrity here.

I am a gigantic fan of Blizzard's games, and have played each and every single one of them since Warcraft 2, but this 'always-online' requirement is an abomination. There is no gaming company on earth that less needs draconian DRM than Blizzard. They would sell their tens of millions of copies even if the game bit off your earlobes upon installation.

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habuza

Not buying it. Tired of being fucked by corporate "america".

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Zyx

If Diablo III was a MMO I could see this always on scheme having a purpose, but it's not.

 

If you happen to be online then the server checks the DRM, and if you're not then you get a timer for 3-7 days at the end of which you would be forced to go online and do the checking again. That would be a better system for a stand alone game.

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DrGerm

I seriously can't believe this article just defended this Maximum BS.

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msidv8tion007

Now after keeping up with this game and the release has held my attention for years..  i am a big fan of blizzard, and a bigger fan of maximum pc magazine.  

I have come to realize that  i am stuck in a job that has me travel quite a bit with no guarantee of internet or even fast internet.  This definantly hampers my ability to play this surely awesome title.  None of this has bothered me because its a problem on my end.  

Now it has come time for release and of course the delay before the release which i have taken in stride as per blizzards impecable record of being on time (LoL, KeK, BeR)...  it is rather infuriating to kno that its no longer my option to have an off or online account.  this decision has been made for me without any feedback from the Gaming community being taken seriously.  Not only that but its in the name of antipiracy...  this means blizzard is calling me a pirate before ive even decided on purchasing their product of which i was going to buy it anyway.  Not only has that happened which in this world i could forgive but maximum PC is advocationg for LESS OPTIONS for computers AS A MAXIMUM WAY OF LIFE?????  correct me if im wrong but you guys have always been advocating more options, more upgrades, more content and more higher thinking than the box the corperate companies give us...  Hell thats what the magazine was founded upon. Now you tell us minimum pc, less options, less content, no choice and no thinking for yourself is the way to go.  i gotta say that you have forced my opinion to sway which is something blizzard never did.  I will not buy or pirate or steal or any other fashion of depraving the company, of a game that i have looked forward to for years because you are ok with mediocrity and a forced mindset being shoved on avid fans and gamers. for us to believe that we are all guilty until proven innocent.. that the way of life is less options and no free thinking.  Pass this along to you blizzard buddies who cut you a check cause you should know my money is involved in the check you recieve from paying my dues  to blizzard..

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Gezzer

I think the thing that gets me is how all software is lumped together in the stated "loses" to piracy.

I think you'd fine that there is a ton of software for commercial use that companies pirate to save a buck. Operating systems, productivity software. Some of this cost a large amount of money, and is a major problem compared to games.

On the other hand game software is less expensive and not nearly the target it's made out to be. Take the Witcher 2 for example. No DRM, free DLC, and other improvements to the game. Is this policy causing ProjeckCD to lose their shirts due to piracy? They say not at all, they're thrilled with how well the game is doing for them. Funny how this is working out isn't it?

I'll admit at one time I pirated software.

For games it had nothing to do with cost and more to do with availablity and potential dubious quality for me. I've never liked the idea of doing a lot of installing and uninstalling with Windoz. It seems to create all sorts of problems down the road. So I stay away from demo versions unless the can be upgraded to the full game. So if I liked a pirated game and could buy it locally then I would. If not it'd just sit there on my harddrive most times. Since steam came into the picture I haven't pirated a game since.

For application software it did have to do with cost most times. What little use I would have for the software didn't justify the out lay of the money they wanted. But I don't even pirate this type pf software any more. Opensource has applications for virtually any need that work as good if not better then the more expensive commercial software. If you know where to look you can cover every need with some sort of free software. So there's just no need to pirate any more for me.

Loses due to shrink (theft, waste, etc.) are a part of doing business and really can't be eliminated. You can reduce them, but the more you try to get close to zero the more it costs. Both in money and customer lose. I work in an industry with a fair amount of shoplifting. We could have a person at the door doing a full cavity search on each shopper. But what would that get us? We'd have no theft lose but we'd lose customers in droves. So why do it?

Current DRMs have less to do with eliminating piracy which will just never happen. And more to do with control. Trying to control any and all potential revenue streams. That's why you have to buy SC2 mods threw Blizzard. Another revenue stream to take advantage of. You could easily replace revenue stream with customer and you wouldn't be too far of the mark. I also kind of sense Activision's heavy hand behind all this.

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Biceps

While I am not going to go into quite as much detail, or use expletives like Nimrod, below, I have to say that he makes some astute observations.  I am going to have to agree with his overall theory that the author of this article either got paid on the side to write this article for someone else's benefit, or that he mixed up his cough syrup with his coffee this morning.

I would also like to add that 'always online' DRM is just as ineffective at stopping 'pirates' who want the single-player game as other DRM schemes (so not at all effective).  As indirectly noted by Nimrod, and as proven by excellent (if sometimes controversial) FPS games such as Call of Duty, the best scheme to encourage massive sales are those that keep the player online for a legitimate reason - excellent multiplayer. "Always online" DRM can be broken easily, just by making the computer think it's connected to something it isn't, so you pretending that it is somehow actually going to stop piracy is, in a word, disingenuous... of course I am assuming that by being a tech writer you actually do have some understanding of how all this stuff works - correct me if I am wrong.

Anyway, I do think that you should probably do at least a little bit of soul-searching before you post an article thats sticks its nose so far up the corporate poop-shoot. FYI, I do not pirate anything at all... I agree that it is wrong and is not in the best interest of the artist or my fellow consumers, so I don't pirate.  I purchase.  However, in reading your article and the obviously deluded rationalizations that were obviously piped straight from some executive's PowerPoint presentation, I was truly disappointed.

Dude, you can do better.

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Eblislyge

Drm is annoying and a nuisance. All it does is punish the consumer. I loved it 2 months ago when my fiber got ripped down during a storm. During the two weeks it took to get it repaired I tried to play starcraft 2. I was so pleased that it wanted me to log in to battlenet to play single player offline. Now run that its not a big deal nonsense by me again.

 

 

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Neufeldt2002

Don't buy Blizzard games simply because they don't make any games that I would want to purchase.

That being said, I have to agree with the sentiment that spouting off the random piracy numbers that the gaming industry, MPAA, RIAA puts out is simply mind numbingly stupid. There have been numerous studies that have shown time and time again how WRONG those numbers are. Frankly, I am very disappointed Thomas McDonald has repeated these numbers with such conviction. I expected more.

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routine

Thank you sir, I could not have agreed more.

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CaptainFabulous

I usually enjoy Thomas' column, but this piece is nothing but industry-propagandized drivel. He and MaxPC should know better than to publish this kind of BS.

Well all know full well that piracy numbers and losses are grossly inflated and vastly unrealistic. To say that a multi billion dollar industry is losing jobs cause they're not making a few more billion is, frankly, retarded. As is insinuating that every pirated copy is a lost sale.

And if I go out and buy an MMO I know full well that I'm buying a game that requires and always-on Internet connection, as that's the very nature of an MMO. But the same cannot be said of a single-player game. If I spend my hard-earned cash on a single-player game I DO NOT expect to be forced into requiring an always-on Internet connection that serves no valid purpose other than to monitor, log, and spy on my activities. THAT is unacceptable, not only to those that value their privacy but also to those that may not have access to a stable Internet connection (such as those that travel or live in remote areas of the country).

I'm sorry that Mr. McDonald doesn't understand this and has instead chosen to become a mouthpiece for Blizzard and the anti-piracy squad.

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Nimrod

Wow its nice to see that Blizzard or the RIAA is buying space on MPC now. This has got to be the most lopsided and just plain stupid article ive ever seen on here.

Thomas McDonald is a person i did once respect but im sorry to say my image of him now if totally forfeit. This dribble is nothing more than an unsubstantiated hit piece on behalf of Blizzard.

First of all, Diablo is a game people get primarily to play online over battle.net any way. For that you ALREADY need a legit key to play online. How many people do they think their going to stop from pirating this game because of the new DRM, the people who only wanted to buy it for single player? Gimme a fucking break.


Second, there is literally NOTHING to substantiate his claim that "piracy costs the software industry about $50 billion a year." We already know for a fact that the people who pirate the most movis music and games are the same people who PURCHASE the most movies music and games. To claim that every game pirated is an ACTUAL loss of a purchase is completely insane.

His attempt to insult the people who are angry about the DRM makes him look infinitely more stupid and pathetic than the people hes attacking. This game was going to sell like hell with or without the online verification. It may force a select few people to purches it who would have only pirated it before, but everyone knows this game is all about the MP and for that you already need a legit game. It may stop millions(if the DRM even works, i have my doubts) from priating D3. But keep in mind that million of people pirating Avatar didnt stop that movie from reaching the #1 all time record in theaters, not by a long shot.

I question what they really have to gain from this, and so should you. Oh and by the way, I noticed theres no mention of the fact that Blizzard to trying everything it can to prevent all mods or conversions for this game. McDonald also fails to metion the fact that no mods is part of why people are so pissed about this DRM.

I contend that by trying to make the DRM issue look like its about piracy hes working on behlaf of Blizzard to hide the fact that they simply dont want people making mods or conversions for this game. Because the player made versions of the game are were they feel like their losing money. Lets be honest, publishers would rather package maps on the disk and then "release" them later as a map pack. Who the fuck would put up with buying crummy off-site developed add on content if good player made mods were available? Not as manny, and I think that is the REAL reason for the DRM.

 

"If you're upset that Blizzard, a company with a uniformly excellent reputation for quality and customer service, is developing a DRM system to protect its property, then don't buy it."

"And, seriously people: Calm the hell down. If this is the biggest problem you have, then you don't have any problems."

 

Again, I see this as a move of desporation. Trying to make it look like this only has to do with piracy isnt going to work. Moreover, your out right lieing about our choises. The history of game development has proven that an outspoken community can make changes in the development of game with regard to these kinds of things. So instead of telling us not to buy it, why dont you just fuck off instead. Or better yet, apply your own logic to your self and just shut up and stay away from the forums where people are voicing their opinions about it.

 

Who do we really have to thank for making the games we like? Is the people who decided to use DRM or is it the developers and the with imagination? Well its the developers, and if wernt for player made mods like Desert Combat, we could not have had BF2, if it wernt for modders we wouldnt have CounterStrike Source. Even Blizzard is now developing their own DOTA2 game. Many of these developers who make our fav games got their start working on mods and total conversions.

 

So whos more pathetic McDoanld, the people complaining about the DRM, or you who wrote an entire god damn essay about the people who are complaining?

 

 

This is truly a new low for MPC and its sad to see it coming from some one who i used to think highly of. McDonald is a complete scumbag.

 

 

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stradric

Wow, read a book or 20. Your spelling and grammar makes any comment you post painful to read and ultimately makes you sound like a moron.

It's amazing too because spell checker has been built into every major web browser for some time now.

> McDonald also fails to metion the fact that no mods is part of why people are so pissed about this DRM

[citation needed]

I'm pretty sure you just made that whole thing up. The majority of comments I've read are people complaining that a once single player game is now required to be online -- not that they can't install mods and cheats. In fact, framing it as "now we can't install mods and cheats" actually hurts the argument. It's stronger as "but I don't have a reliable internet connection".

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Nimrod

You really are kind of a shit faced moron. I never used to word "cheats" so please do us all a favor and fuck off because its painfully obvious that you dont even know what a mod is.

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stradric

Idiot, cheats are mods.

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Sweeney

I am extremely mortified to say that I agree with Nimrod's points here.

Unfortunately, you should really spend more time on learning how to spell and less time thinking up boring ways to use the word f---. Also, calling somebody a "complete scumbag" because their opinion about a lame videogame requirement makes you....kind of a complete scumbag.

Seriously, lose the completely unnecessary profanity and puerile ad hominem attacks. You might actually be taken seriously.

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luusyphre

Who plays Diablo offline anyways?

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Lhot

Call it what you will...it's plain old DRM or worse...Blizzard wants control over what's installed on MY comp...no thx...they don't get MY money this time  :/

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Engelsstaub

I find your position well-stated, Mr. McDonald. IMO there is this sense of entitlement among many today that is here saying "you owe me a game that is able to be cracked and freely redistributed." They feel they have a right to be entertained by the commercial works of others and that theft is only theft when done so with physical media. "You can't steal information like ones and zeroes!"

The online-only approach is onerous for sure, but the pirates brought it on themselves...and, unfortunately, everyone else as well. They now "stole" from everyone.

Personally I wouldn't buy the game unless it was an online-only MP anyway, but that's the thing; if you don't like it don't buy it. Vote with your wallet. That is if you were ever going to open your wallet in the first place.

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Nimrod

Its quite clear to any one with a half a fucking brain that Blizzard is only doing this this to prevent MODS not piracy. Get TF over your self.

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Engelsstaub

I stated my opinions, game-thief. Get over yourself. (One word, to "anyone with half a...brain.")

...pretty sure its about your piracy.

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msidv8tion007

thats almost as stupid as saying homicide is only done for one reason...  its small thinkers such as yourself that are missing the bigger picture.. yes there are good reasons for DRM  but there is also bad reasons for DRM..  but the biggest thing it kills is creativity not profit..  and seeing as it isnt killing profit from your wallet i see no reason u should be concerned in a topic of freedom and creativity.. go buy your games and support it from your end... this online notepad is our game and we are deeply concerned for the underlying reasons behind it.  if that was made fully clear we could rest, but unlike you we know when we arent being told the whole truth...

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Engelsstaub

This dude's piece is OP-ED. All of his columns I've seen in the print mag are op-ed. Op-ed means opinion/editorial. I have an opinion, he has an opinion, and so do you. I've now read yours and I'm just going to stick with mine, ok? I'm just going to take my small mind to bed and rest well in the smug knowledge that some snot-nosed little punks aren't going to be able to steal another game. Makes me feel all warm and fuzzy when someone among the Me-Generation gets their feelings of entitlement hurt.

If you feel you aren't being told the whole truth here it's because it's opinion. You could just "rest" anyway. Wake up tomorrow, go outside, and enjoy your life. Or piss it away playing too many games and demanding the truth about why some game company did what they were entirely within their rights to do with their product that you don't have to buy. Or steal.

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msidv8tion007

GOOD FOR YOU !!! go rest and let us smug snot-nosed lil punks figure this one out... okay.... and we will let you know when we have gotten the message across that these beloved companies of yours, have a working system that doesnt stop mods and creativity as per our complaint..  call it what you want ur opinion is out there...  but try looking around and see the the world for what it is instead of a single minded, black and white world..   i promise those shades of grey arent that frightening..

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meekbarbarian

"Piracy costs the software industry about $50 billion a year, plus thousands of lost jobs that could have been generated by that revenue."

That's pretty much an outright lie the industry (notably the BSA) spreads every year. All of the "industry reports" and the statistics they release have been debunked over and over and over. Every single year. Every single time. Those numbers are as close to reality as Santa Claus is.

http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20110512/10183914249/bsa-2010-piracy-report-its-back-its-just-as-wrong-as-before.shtml
Links to a handful of the experts debunking those numbers, and many of those links go deeper into detail and link to even more reports. The majority of those studies equate a download with a lost sale, despite overwhelming evidence that the majority of pirates fall into one of two groups:
A) people who, if they couldn't pirate something, wouuldn't have bought it anyways
B) people who, after pirating, end up buying the pirated item anyways to support it

Plus, there's a MAJOR mistake in your logic. Even if people didn't spend that money on software, it WAS spent on the economy. Those lost jobs? Just try and keep up with how many new game studios open everytime people are fired or quit from a previous studio. And there's a word for all this disruption and chaos: innovation.

I don't see anyone crying about how ferriers and wheel wrights and blacksmiths are out of work because the automobile industry took over horse & buggy transporation. That caused thousands of lost jobs.

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georgy

DRM only hurts the honest customers.  Thieves are going to steal it regardless.  I wish the gaming industry would understand this.

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stradric

That may apply to some games, but not Diablo 3 since it's a true client/server model.  Cracking the "always online" would require the need to emulate battle.net.  That's a pretty big challenge in itself.  Then, since there is no level generation code on the client, the cracker would need to duplicate Blizzard's level generation code.  Even if they were able to put a stub in place, you would never get the same sophistication from a pirate coder as you would from Blizzard's multi-year dev cycle.

By actually buying the retail product, you're not subjecting yourself to the hacky attempts at implementing the server portion of this game.  The retail version of Diablo 3 will far surpass the pirated copy -- if one even existed that was good enough to call a "copy".

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