How to Build: All-in-One PC

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Tollfreenumbers

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SirGCal

Accept on the loopint.com website, the LP-2150 system is not available under products... Unless I'm missing something... So while it might have been a neat idea, it might not be anymore. Or they hide it from their options. I do see some on Amazon for ~ 300 still. But not on the linked site.

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mikeymop

I tried to build one of these for my current build, and I found one that actually has dual slot graphics. However the inability to put in a PSU that's greater than 400w was a deal breaker.

I look forward to Intel pushing this standard forward as it would be perfect for someone who goes to a lot of LANs and likes the minimal footprint of an AiO.

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MaximumMike

Interesting, Thanks for the article, Gordon.

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appleroxinhouston

in the "ingredients" list the CPU was accidentally labeled as the "case" LOL

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Peanut Fox

A one thousand dollar desktop solution and there's no dedicated graphics? That's a little more than a deal breaker for me.

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burntham77

I use two desktop systems at home. One is a gaming machine, and the other is a low end AMD-based workstation. This AIO setup would be a nice replacement for my current workstation (it would be one less desktop case to worry about), although for me the price is a little high. If I could get an AMD version and I could knock 200-300 dollars off the cost (using a hybrid drive and a cheap AMD chip would help), I would jump on this in a second. Even with the current setup, you could use some cheaper parts here or there and trim a few dollars off of the price.

As we move towards smaller, slimmer machines like this, having custom build options is one thing that will allow system builders to remain relevant.

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gothliciouz

what?.. a laptop is so much cheaper and is portable.

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R01010100

I work for a small computer shop that is an Intel Technology Provider. When Ivy Bridge came out, I asked our Intel rep about using Ivy Bridge chips with HD4000 graphics on 6 series motherboards and his response was that the chipset on the motherboard dictates the graphics, i.e. i3/i5/i7 chips with HD4000 graphics on a 6 series board will only give a maximum of HD3000 level performance. To get the full benefit of the HD4000 graphics you would need a motherboard with the 7 series chipset. So for this build, you would replace the DH61AG board with the DQ77KB board to get the full benefit of the HD4000 graphics. The DQ77KB board is around $30 more than the DH61AG, but that's supposedly $30 spent towards slightly better graphics performance. I would be interested in seeing what kind of benchmarks maximumpc would get with this configuration change, if any.

Just my two cents based on the information I got from our Intel rep.

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Bullwinkle J Moose

I would need the ESata over marginally better graphics

These things will only sell to the widest audience if the internal upgrade path is replaced with external connectivity

Most of the Mini ITX Low Profile Haswell boards eliminate the ESata as well

First they lock you out of your software with DRM, and now they lock you out of your hardware upgrade potential.....so......

Why would I need one?

The board Max PC chose has both ESata as well as XP drivers available

It has the best compatibility with both software and hardware at this point

None of the new Haswell Mini ITX boards I've seen have XP drivers aviailable do they?

As obsolete as many of you believe XP to be, this doesn't sound very PC compatible to me

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R01010100

I see your point. looking at all of the different 7 and 8 series chipset boards in the thin mini itx form factor, esata appears to be absent from all of them.

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hypersonic

I love the functionality of these AIO's and can't wait to get rid of my tower which is on my desk ! Anyway, we've got 3 categories. The first is the humble PC followed by the laptop then the tablet. All, in an ever shrinking space to install hardware. I believe there's enough space behind the screen of an AIO to install a great CPU, motherboard & graphics card to do whatever the hell you want including gaming. But manufacturers have to make enough compatible parts for this to be a realistic scenario for users.
When they said earlier this year that the death of the PC was imminent I couldn't work out what would be its replacement, now I know it'd be the AIO.
The biggest benefactor of this DIY AIO's or AIO's in general could be AMD's APU line up. This all in one configuration, means fewer parts to install and the cost would be a lot lower than you might think ! Be that as it may, I wouldn't try doing this until steamroller arrives. So in the mean time I'd go for a Intel CPU + Radeon card + SSD + win7 (because win8 blows) build etc.

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HKUSPC40

First thing I said when I saw this headline was "no." I want my desktop to be 100lbs., four feet tall, and sound like a nitromethane dragster. It's because this is 'Merica and yes I need a $60,000 lifted truck to haul my groceries.

It's funny this was the first thing to come to mind. A build your own all-in-one is probably quite nice lol.

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PCWolf

While a nice concept, its still only good for simple tasks like Web Browsing, Listening to Music or watching Streaming Movies. Going on Facebook & playing Simple Games like Angry Birds. A great PC for your mom or other technologically impaired relative.

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burntham77

If there was an AMD option, we could build one with an AMD APU, and some of those are surprisingly good for PC games.

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daysean78

I don't think it will ever be able to replace a gaming desktop, but I think as a family computer, an AiO would be nice and I'd consider building one in the future.

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PCLinuxguy

I agree, though considering AiOs normally are laptop internals behind a big screen. one could take a gaming laptop's guts and perform something similar. MainGear has a gaming AiO called the Alpha. Might want to check that out and see how it compares to your ideas :-)

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andrewc513

Unless you're doing something CPU-intensive that would need an i5/i7, I think a VESA-mounted Intel NUC would be a million times easier and cheaper. They come with a VESA mount out of the box. A low voltage Ivy Bridge i3 plus a nice size mSATA SSD and plenty of RAM would be a perfect "basic use" home all-in-one.

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PCLinuxguy

the problem with the NUC is that it overheats, or gets darn close to it (MaxPC even mentioned that issue due to the way some of the parts are laid out) However Zotac's Zbox lineup is slowly refreshing to i3 and i5 ivy bridge CPUs, along with Trinity AMD APUs.

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Renegade Knight

Agreed. A gaming rig may not be ready for the NIC. But mount one to a touch screen monitor and you are done.

But it you want more power DIY is the way to go.

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PCLinuxguy

Maingear as the Alpha. pricey but a good attempt at a gaming AiO compared to the one in this article. but I'd still rather have a desktop for gaming.

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crc32

I could see building one of these as a family pc. And I might, seeing it as a fun build. Be a bit of challenge.

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