8 Things We Love About Windows 8

47

Comments

+ Add a Comment
avatar

polka

a friend's sister-in-law makes $65 hourly on the laptop. She has been laid off for 6 months but last month her pay was $19426 just working on the laptop for a few hours. Go to this web site and read more NuttyRich dot com

avatar

livebriand

Fuck you.

avatar

yammerpickle2

I just want to make sure that I have option not to install metro, and another to default to start button.

avatar

Mike_Holli

You can just set it to load the Windows 7 interface, and put vistart into the startup folder. By doing this you can bypass the Metro interface, and ViStart gives you back your start button.

avatar

John A

After a few days on Windows 8 I have decided to forgo this new generation and stick with 7,Vista and Ubuntu. It seems that every other new Windows is a flop and I think that 8 maybe OK for tablets but not a desktop.

avatar

LatiosXT

If the interface is the only thing holding you back, then enjoy Windows 7 for the rest of your life. Or go to Linux.

Because Metro, like it or not, is here to stay.

avatar

win7fanboi

I am sure interface will change during that time span -_-

avatar

RUSENSITIVESWEETNESS

The Cloud may make you wet in the seat, but it will be a cold day in hell before I put my data out there for all to see, steal, or lose.

avatar

Pruneface

you know, the newbie raiding sounds pretty cool....

avatar

scoop6274

c'mon, Metro doesn't help. Switching between metro and desktop to start a new program or app is very disjointed. It is in fact distracting. Imagine for a moment, your typical employee. They have started the facebook/twitter app on metro. They're working on a spreadsheet on the desktop and have to switch to metro to start a new program they haven't pind to the taskbar. Suddenly they see some "uber" important update one of their friends has posted and now has become completely distracted and now feels the need to go to facebook/twitter to comment on said status. Once in, they get distracted by other updates and now an hour of work time is lost because of one distaction.Is this really a good idea for a workspace at work? I'm thinking not. I have a feeling that many businesses are going to get hung up on this.

And before anyone accuses me of not trying it, I have and just couldn't get past the metro ui. That and the fact that the apps dominate the workspace and don't allow customization of window size when you set them to a side of the workspace. I don't care about social integration. I don't want my data (of any kind) stored out in space on someones server. I don't even like the fact that I had to log in to w8cp with my Windows Live account when I set it up. There really isn't anything in w8cp that entices me to switch.

avatar

AnUnknownSource

Though it's proven that morale, and therefore productivity is higher when employees have access to the "outside world" during the workday, if you oppose your employees accessing social media that badly, then why not disable access to it altogether? I'd be willing to bet once the W8 Enterprise SKU is detailed, that'll be a possibility...

avatar

Bullwinkle J Moose

Windows 7 boot time = 51 Seconds

Windows 8 Boot time - 32 seconds

Windows XP SP2 booting up from a compact Flash Card on the incredibly slow ATOM 330 1.6Ghz 1st generation computer = 12 seconds!

Fastest Boot Time = XP

Best Value, security and ease of use for an Internet Computer = Ubuntu
(FREE)

When STEAM run natively on Ubuntu, Microsoft will have no reason to live!

avatar

stradric

I love Ubuntu, but that's nonsense. Microsoft provides compelling reasons for developers to user their platform -- especially large commercial ones like Adobe. Photoshop, for example, doesn't exist on Linux because cost is too high for Adobe to develop on such a fragmented platform. They also claim that Linux users don't like paying for software, which I'm willing to bet is mostly accurate.

Meanwhile, Microsoft has a consistent set of APIs and application frameworks that are heavily documented and (relatively) uniformly supported across OS updates and revisions.

The bottom line is that Windows is more appealing to the masses and more appealing to developers. Plus, it has the leading graphics platform, DirectX. For businesses, MS Office remains the leading productivity suite by a long shot.

So Steam on Linux is but a scratch. The simple fact that Steam doesn't exist on Linux right now illustrates just how unappealing of a platform it is. For power users and developers of cross-platform and web apps, Linux can't be beat.

avatar

Malistair

You're nothing short of delusional. The chances of gaming on Linux being on the level of Windows' are astronomical.

Linux gaming = playing video games with Amish people.

avatar

win7fanboi

I see two most common arguments for using Linux -

1) Its free compared to windows - My time costs money, so while I can keep looking for software that do what I need to get done after a lot of workarounds, I rather not. Video editing software, drivers, games, etc come to mind.

2) Its secure - Same argument Mac users used to make... its safer only because/until it command a tiny market share. There have been documented issues that took years to fix.

With Win8 microsoft is trying to target crowd who use tablet as their main computer (folks hang around facebook all day come to mind). I think they are screwing themselves by doing this. Either the common tablet user is a member of the iCult, in which case there will never be any reason compelling enough to make them switch, or they will go with android. Even if Win8 is sold on great hardware, microsoft lacks the eco systems that apple and google have built. They should focus on desktop users IMO.

avatar

bpstone

Please do not comment on Linux in general anymore. Understood? Use your favorite operating system and be quiet. It is like someone giving a lecture how to build a jet when they have no professional training or experience doing so.

avatar

win7fanboi

Fuck you and be quiet. Understood?

avatar

Malistair

"It is like someone giving a lecture how to build a jet when they have no professional training or experience doing so."

I expected that from you. Typical Linux elitist quote. Another reason why some people will never embrace Linux, if that means having to put up with snobs who think it's far more worthwhile to waste time with workarounds than actual work (and think anybody who says otherwise is an imbecile).

I rest my case.

avatar

win7fanboi

Notice he didn't have any counter argument or advice on how you can alleviate some of the issues of not having professional video editing software, compatible drivers, native games, etc for linux.

“Linux OS is expected to remain niche over the next five years with its share below 2 percent because of the remaining high costs of application migration from Windows to Linux. In the consumer market, Linux will be run on less than 1 percent of PCs, as Linux's success with mini-notebooks was short-lived and few mini-notebooks are preloaded with it today,” the company said.

http://news.softpedia.com/news/Windows-7-8-vs-OS-X-vs-Linux-vs-Chrome-OS-A-Numbers-Game-215942.shtml

He still goes on to tout Linux as just as viable platform as Windows:

"Have you ever used a Linux desktop environment operating system beyond running it off a CD? It is very capable of playing video games. "

How do you know bp without a single first rate title being available on Linux? FYI, Mac has more than triple the market share than Linux and still doesn't have Mac only titles.

avatar

bpstone

Are you talking about desktops again? At the moment it is not suited for gamers. So what are you trying to argue about? How about you actually dig into the statistics. Love your cash cow. Fuck it! Personally I do not give a damn. I have no interest in flaming it out with you two. Your dick will be the same at the end of it all. So would it be worth it? ;P Have fun! ^_^

Here are some quick finds:
http://www.zdnet.com/blog/open-source/linux-snickers-at-microsofts-victory-declaration/9405
http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/172357/desktop_takes_back_seat_at_linux_conference.html
http://www.linuxfoundation.org/news-media/announcements/2012/01/linux-foundation-releases-enterprise-linux-user-report
http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/204423/five_reasons_linux_beats_windows_for_servers.html
http://www.zdnet.com/blog/open-source/nvidia-joins-the-linux-foundation/10530

avatar

Malistair

win7fanboi, I agree. I remember trying to install my laptop's webcam on Ubuntu so it can work properly for Skype. It took an agonizing 3-4 hours to find the proper drivers, looking up message boards (complete with condescending Linux fanboy douchebags), and trying every trial-and-error method they suggested. In the end, I got a webcam image that's upside down, luridly tinted, and completely unusable. Just for curiosity's sake, and to compare to my experience on Linux, it was a whole lot easier to install it in (surprise, surprise) Windows Vista, which only took me 5 minutes.

No average computer user wants to waste time dicking around command lines for hours on end just to get a simple device to work. They've got better things to do than that.

avatar

bpstone

Have you ever used a Linux desktop environment operating system beyond running it off a CD? It is very capable of playing video games. Most general consumers purchased their personal or office system/s with Windows pre-installed. A lot of times the new owner has no interest in changing it. Those who might are often afraid to do so themselves. To put it simple, the market is not there for game developers. It has little to do with the actual operating system and instead more to do with simple economics; a.k.a the general consumer market.

avatar

Malistair

I have tried a few Linux distros myself, and while I agree that it's a great platform in its own right, I hate the fact that it doesn't support games out of the box.

If, by 'very capable of playing video games' you mean 'installing Wine', forget it. I find the idea ridiculous. Installing MAME on Windows, I can understand, but installing a half-baked Windows emulator on Linux!?

Until Linux has a graphics API comparable to Windows' DirectX, and if that means I have to settle for playing an amateur game with Tux as the main character (talk about narcissism), then I seriously doubt that Linux will grow out of the 1-2% market share that it's been stuck in for so long.

Then again, on the bright side, that means no hacker will waste their time trying to hack a Linux PC.

avatar

bpstone

Quote, "If, by 'very capable of playing video games' you mean 'installing Wine', forget it. I find the idea ridiculous. Installing MAME on Windows, I can understand, but installing a half-baked Windows emulator on Linux!?"

No. I meant games can be specifically developed for Linux. Wine imitates a Windows environment for certain games to run. I kept my response simple.

Quote, "Until Linux has a graphics API comparable to Windows' DirectX, and if that means I have to settle for playing an amateur game with Tux as the main character (talk about narcissism), then I seriously doubt that Linux will grow out of the 1-2% market share that it's been stuck in for so long."

You are talking about things you obviously do not understand just yet. At least research before replying. OpenGL is superior to Microsoft's closed source DirectX. There are YouTube users who do not understand game development, but create asinine video comparisons. OGL is cross-platform and is not specifically for Linux. Do not talk economics with me. Actual hackers target Linux all the time in the server world.

avatar

bautrey

The only thing holding me back to switching to linux completely are the games. Once I can be sure all my games will work on Linux, bye bye Windows!!

avatar

bpstone

If you are running a high-end system, Wine would suffice for some games. Linux is much more suited for professional use (servers and workstations). Not for average consumers wanting to play games. That can easily change in the future. If enough consumer enthusiasts started pushing for native Linux support, then you would see many developers doing so. I highly doubt that will happen anytime soon. There is a lot of undue prejudice of it being inferior. In actuality that ideology is complete nonsense.

avatar

TsunamiZ

when you factor in startup time, you have to factor in features

avatar

TsunamiZ

TOO MUCH BLUE!!! they still haven't added the ability to change the color of the blue interface.

avatar

AnUnknownSource

If you go to the desktop and right click as you did in Windows 7 you can change the window color. Not sure where else you see too much blue. The metro background can be changed from the settings bar by hovering over the top right corner, choosing settings, then "More PC Settings" at the bottom right of the sidebar. Then under personalization, choose start screen at the top.

avatar

JohnP

From another post somewhere that I made a copy of. I apologize to the writer for lack of credit.

The Ribbon UI is more efficient in every single way compared to previous interfaces. Number of clicks, feature discovery, keyboard short-cut discovery, screen size, and feature time to find. The only valid argument against the Ribbon UI is refusal of change and progression, and a learning curve to find the new locations of features.

And improvements to the Windows 8 Desktop experience? Improved multi-monitor support, native USB 3.0 stack, reduced boot time, significantly lower memory footprint, Storage Spaces (virtualized storage pools), a new files system (ReFS), improved SSD support and performance, built-in antivirus and spyware protection, improved automatic updating system (less frequent reboot required updates), built in support for creating system images and full system restore, built-in ISO mounting, built-in VHD mounting, built-in PDF support, automatic cloud based backup of system settings, personal files, and Metro applications, a new Apple Time Capsule like interface for Shadow Copy, Windows Store sells desktop software as well, drastically improved task manager, drastically improved file management allowing you to pause file copying jobs and finish them later, Windows 8 has basically become rootkit proof when combined with UEFI, Hyper-V, and various reviews of the beta candidate builds confirm noticeably improved performance over Windows 7 SP1. And that's just a small sample of the various desktop related improvements. And it's still PRE-BETA! Many of the future major software applications haven't even been publicly shown at all (Media Player and Media Center [which are both expecting some HUGE changes], and how Office 15 will tie in with Windows 8). Anybody claiming that Windows 8 brings no improvements to the desktop experience is simply ignoring the facts. And I promise you that even the most dedicated desktop proponents will dip their toe into Metro every once in a while once the Windows Store gains some steam. Anybody that owns an iOS, Android, or Windows Phone device knows how addicting and effective these micro transaction application stores are. Once one is available on every desktop in the world it will be hard to resist jumping into it every once in a while.

avatar

kevaskous

+1 and copied, i am likely to early adopt this os myself.

avatar

The Corrupted One

Now where is the function to disable Metro?

avatar

avenger48

Exactly. Perhaps a checkbox in the "personalize" menu that says something like "classic mode" and brings back the start menu, assigning metro access to something like Scroll Lock or a multikey shortcut (Alt+Win, perhaps?) would be a godsend. If MS just added this ONE FEATURE, I would upgrade to W8. As it is, I don't want to touch Metro with a 10' pole.

avatar

rorrr

press it from anywhere within the Windows UI (Metro or Desktop) and you'll be able to search for files

on that note, there are a ton of new keyboard shortcuts for Windows 8. another reason to look forward to its release

avatar

szore

Newbie RAID sounds intriguing.

avatar

opticallog

If anyone can figure out how to log out of the "People" app (or any other Metro app) when you've done a local account install of the OS, post please. I had a co-worker sign in to her Microsoft Live account in the People app on a test machine I setup, and no one could figure out how to log out of her Windows Live account.

avatar

AnUnknownSource

If you hover over the top right corner, and then click on the settings icon (cog) then choose "More PC Settings" at the bottom of the sidebar, you will have a User tab on the left of the screen. On that tab, click "Switch to a local account" and follow the directions. Basically, while logged into a Hotmail account, you're on your "roaming" profile. Any changes (ok some, not all) you make while logged in should follow you to another machine if you log in again with your Hotmail account.

To close a metro app, hover over the top middle of the screen, and hold the left mouse button, and drag the entire app to the bottom right of the screen and let go. It's now closed.

avatar

cc3d

I doubt any of the nay-sayers on here have even given W8 a shot yet! I thought the same things and still do in some cases, but I upgraded to W8 on my work machine (I mirrored my HD so I could go back later).

[i7 920, 4GB ram, dual 24 inch monitors]

It's a new paradigm and this usually scares people. The way the Microsoft ID links all your accounts together is VERY USEFUL and starts to make more sense of the metro interface. I've been doing my regular heavy work on this machine.

being able to sync your account on multiple PCs is interesting and VERY USEFUL! The integration of mail, web, calendar, twitter, Facebook, pictures, skydrive starts to congeal WHEN YOU USE IT!

RESET & REFRESH windows 8? This is a welcome feature!! Need to reinstall windows? Refresh it instead!! Who hasn't wished for that!!

There's more to it and it becomes apparent as you get into it. Metro stays out of the way when you want it to.

my $0.02

avatar

guntlager

Really? That new paradigm line is what one occasionally reads from the Mac fanboys when someone doesn't buy marketing dribble line "post PC world" and "iCloud"

I would suggest that ruining a proven work flow for people who get real work done on their computers is much scarier than someone's "new paradigm". It isn't that Metro is all that bad of a concept. The problem is that Metro is no substitute for the Windows 7 Start menu. Users need a choice.

I'll grant that the current release is only a preview with a lot of work to be done. On my 15in laptop Metro doesn't look too bad but on my 24in desktop display is really sucks.

Additionally there is not one Metro app that has either the capability or flexibility of a desktop app performing the same function. Most of them are just stupid. Do I really want to see how my investments are doing in a little green rectangle? Not at all. How about the weather out side. Wow, a blue rectangle! Fugly.

None of the Metro stuff even comes close to the apps that come standard with an iPad and let's be honest here, whether you like iToys or not that is Microsoft's target.

avatar

loozer

There's one metro app that does all the desktop can. It's called desktop.

All other apps are irrelevant.

Also, the new start menu is actually an improvement. Just get used to typing into it.

avatar

thetechchild

What a ridiculous complaint. The entire issue you have is the Metro GUI & "Users need a choice?" Another of MPC's recent articles showed you how to always start up with the classic Desktop rather than the Metro UI. And I seriously doubt it'll take more than a few months after the RTM release of W8 for a 3rd party to rip Metro out of it altogether.

Seriously, if Metro is the only issue you have, then I can't see why you don't consider W8 a major improvement, looking at all the other new features introduced.

avatar

kevaskous

Man, lots of people love to find reasons NOT to upgrade, and if they can't they make one up. Having used every Microsoft since Win2k/Me where in their beta stages, as well as more than a few distro's of Linux over the years and Mac (I hate Mac....) I really love metro, it took some getting used to at first and dropping my preconceptions but it's good.

Once I played with is organized and tweaked it i found it -much- faster than my previous start, hell for the fact alone of i use a dock for Windows 7, i won't bother with Win8, no need! Not only your list but i have many of my own reasons but the UI honestly is a gem once you get over the omg change effect. This will be especially useful for HTPC's where small tect and small icons are laughably useless.

avatar

someuid

It boots fast. That is about the only thing that impresses me so far.

Metro is stupid simple. That will be good for some people.

Haven't tried task manager yet, or file copying. Can't put it on the network yet here at work so I'm kinda stuck.

avatar

FrancesTheMute

I haven't had too much time to play around with it, but I've got it running on an old Dell D630 laptop and it seems to be running just fine. Haven't noticed any major performance issues.

The main thing I'll be hoping for is the ability to completely turn off Metro. I'm sure it will be great on machines that have a touch screen, but at least give us the option to turn it off if we want to.

avatar

Neufeldt2002

Normally, I would have left this article alone, but I must say that love is subjective. The only useful thing is Storage Spaces. The rest is Meh at best. I agree that some of the bells and whistles are coming along, but some features are seriously over rated.

avatar

ilfipian

I'm not seeing anything compelling in this list, just fluff.

avatar

TommM

Agreed. I've yet to see one upgrade in Windows 8 that wants to make me jump from Win 7.

Log in to MaximumPC directly or log in using Facebook

Forgot your username or password?
Click here for help.

Login with Facebook
Log in using Facebook to share comments and articles easily with your Facebook feed.