Column: Take the Socket Pledge With Me

11

Comments

+ Add a Comment
avatar

jgottberg

Honestly, I don't see this as being as big a deal as it appears to be. Look at upgrade cycles over the last few years. Procs are fine, it's the GPU's that are driving performance. An enthusiast is much more likely to upgrade a video card than proc/mobo. I actually think it's a smart business model.

avatar

wumpus

Sure, Intel. Kill the socket.

Watch the desktop die. Watch x86 die. The only real advantage you have right now is in situations where power consumption is a non-issue and performance matters. Let the tick/tock cycle slow down and watch Qualcomm blow by you. Its not like there anything but the existence of a better x86 solution keeping ARM-based android boxen from powering large desk-based displays.

The "Death of the desktop" is hardly the sure thing pundits talk about, but it is up to Intel (and Microsoft, who is doing their part to bury it with win8) to keep it alive.

avatar

harz3000gt

Wow. Did you even read the article? The socket isn't going anywhere. #TiradeOverNothing

avatar

jgottberg

lol, hash-tagging!

avatar

mh15216

I don't really feel like there's a decline in the "builder driven" market. (There couldn't be for Intel, Nvidia, and the storage industry all to post RECORD profits) I feel like the decline of the PC is in the "pre-fab low to mid-grade" market where sale #'s were giant. But in reality these sales were giant because it was cheap, low margin computing and the true usage of these computers was to help Johnny Content Viewer surf the web, check emails, and use MS office PowerPoint for school projects.

Then tablets come along and take away that huge fraction of the "Desktop PC-industry" (purely by unit numbers alone)due to their perfect form factor for Johnny content viewer. So purely numbers game sure it looks like a decline in the markets for desktop PC's but SURELY the core audience rocking overclocked hexa core's with 64GB dedicated, and a RAID arrangement of SSD's hastily sending 66fps to an arrangement of SLI or Crossfire GPU's... DID NOT SAY "Hey, I think this iPad should suffice for my gaming/poweruser needs.

No sir, I disagree and believe that the CORE group who are the "DESKTOP USERS" are still there, and all the facey facey bookers, and crappy blogsters, and content viewers are quite satisfied with their mobile and or tablet support. But us people making the stuff they ever so desire to view.... we're still alive and well bleeding with technology every 2 quarters or so.

avatar

lostcause64

So, according to dgrmouse, since there are people that don't upgrade, no one should be upgrading. That mentality would really have us way behind in technology in all areas - from automobiles to homes to televisions...

avatar

dgrmouse

You missed my point entirely.

Nearly every time I've wanted to upgrade my processor over the last 20 years or so, it's required a motherboard swap as well. Even in cases where the sockets were the same, I often had to switch boards to upgrade the memory subsystems or whatever. I'd wager that I've performed more upgrades over the years than the average user, but I don't think my upgrades would've been hampered in any meaningfully significant way by having my CPUs soldered to their motherboards.

avatar

wk

according to the current trend towards ready made ultra thin, mobile touch stuff. This step is accordingly expected.
shame that we (old PC users) will miss building our own systems, upgrades and experiments. even small joys such as upgrading my 5 years old Acer Extensa 5220 laptop from celeron to core2duo processor.

avatar

aarcane

I could reasonably see processors going to a hybrid approach, where low and mid range chips and mobos get paired up to save costs and pass on a (small percentage) of the savings to the low end customer market at both the DIY and OEM channels. I don't, however, see Intel or AMD giving the big middle finger to the large Gaming, DIY, and (home) Server markets that drive nearly all high end processor sales.

avatar

dgrmouse

Honestly, I couldn't care less.

Third party motherboard manufacturers rarely bring anything to the table, and I honestly don't feel like the world is a better place because we're able to buy motherboards based on Intel's latest $50 reference design from a dozen vendors in prices ranging from $55-$350. Quite the contrary: with so much hardware being moved directly into the CPU package, the motherboard has become ever more of a basic commodity item and ever less suitable for a boutique or prestige purchase. And with Intel's current drive to maximize power efficiency, MB vendors will be force-fed parts lists and designs. Third parties simply won't be allowed to build motherboards with subpar voltage regulators or capacitors and the like. If a motherboard is a motherboard is a motherboard and they amount to a negligible fraction of a system's cost, I am absolutely fine with them being sold as a unit with the CPU.

I understand that Gordon has a Thinkpad he's owned since 1993 in which he's upgraded the CPU and other parts a dozen times, but the number of folks who upgrade their CPU independently of their motherboard has probably been pretty small since socket 7 or before. Coincidentally, the number of folks who need exotic (and presumably expensive to license) technologies on their motherboards (like SLI) is similarly small. For the rest of us, having CPUs come soldered to their motherboards is probably not even going to be a noticeable issue. And if it destroys the market for selling "premium" motherboards, heatsinks, and cooling systems I will sooner laugh than cry.

avatar

MAIZE1951

dgmouse : That's a bit cold young man (I can say that because the year I was born in is part of my user name.) I want all my processors to be where god intended it to be. That's in a socket.

Log in to MaximumPC directly or log in using Facebook

Forgot your username or password?
Click here for help.

Login with Facebook
Log in using Facebook to share comments and articles easily with your Facebook feed.