Murphy's Law: The Library of Congress Wakes Steve Jobs' Dragon

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hotmetalslugs

I guess if it's in the EULA, and says your iPhone could be bricked, then you will have been forewarned.

This is not entirely unlike the Wii system updates.  They tell you flat out: if you've messed with the software, and installed 3rd party stuff, don't blame us when you hit GO and this device is inoperable.

(Complaining about it would only get one so far, though that is MaxPC's favorite sport.)

 

 

 

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M1K3Z0R

Anyone recall how hard apple tried to stop palm devices from syncing with iTunes? and that was just iTunes, which anyone can get for free. Behold the rage!

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thinknoffcenter

If Steve Jobs were to incorporate a way to brick the iphone when it detected "unapproved" firmware, his precious iphone sales would tank, no doubt about it.....though he may be steaming about this whole thing, he realizes there is really nothing he can do about it....and that's why I love it so much.

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nHeroGo

...since Dr. King had a dream, I'm sure. At least for a handful of hackers and their iJobs. Front page stuff on NY Times - let's calm down. You will still happily give your money away, because you are not holding it it right. I don't have AT&T. I don't have an iTelephone. Who's the winner here?

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IFLATLINEI

This is just a small win for the consumer. Theres ways to go yet. You may even argue that this means very little since people have, are, and will continue to "Jailbreak" their phones anyways. The consumer has spoken loud and clear for some time now and the message is Freedom Rules whether we exercise it or not.  

 

All this really is though is a response to what no one can stop or control. Many of us simply choose to ignore many of these rules about DRM for example because if we buy it we think we can do what we please with it stopping short of distributing it and profiting of course. 

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Mark17

It's a great day for the consumer, but I now wonder what Steve Jobs' and Apple's reaction to this will be. What will they will try to do to circumvent people from jailbreaking their phones now?

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bikerbub

does this mean the same for rooting an android device?

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jacobhweeks

No way will that ever happen to Android phones. The CEO's of Google are not like that prick Steve Jobs, they are for the people. Google is more like a modern day Robin Hood of the web. They take the money from large businesses to fund their advancements in web technology. Not from the people like Apple, or Microsoft. The only reason Google would dislike modded Android ROM's is because certain ROM's had taken the liberty of stealing apps from Google, modifying them and allowing them to be installed with their ROM. Google is for the open source movement, but there has to be a limit.

In my opinion, Jobs is the ultimate evil! He takes chunks of the peoples money, then tries to take away their choice of what to do with their belongings. EVIL!

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Five Rabbits

It'll be interesting to see what apple does next.  I wouldn't put it past them to brick jailbroken iPhones, but that could put them in danger of getting hit with an anti-trust.  Its not totaly unprecendented, MS got hit by one for bundling IE with Windows among other things.

I think its amazing people put up with this in phones and a few other 'technological' devices.  What if you had to buy GM or Toyota brand gas for your car, or could only put on their brand of after-market modifcations?  What if you couldn't modify a house after you bought it because you wouldn't experince the house as the realtor intended you to?  Im having a hard time thinking of a market that's as controling of the user's experince as the smart-phone market.  Even the RIAA and MPAA don't have that much control over their products (though they probably wish the did).

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Hg Dragon

Your car analogy is a little off. Car manufacturers can and do void warranties for aftermarket parts. I replaced my clutch assembly with a unit that didn't slip as much as the factory and changed to a lightened flywheel since the stock one was so heavy that the engine revs were sluggish accelerating and decelerating. The upshot? A much more responsive engine and better shift "feel." The consequence? When I went in to have the third gear syncro replaced, my drivetrain warranty was rejected because of those parts, even though the manufacturer issued a tech service bulletin stating that there was a defect leading to failure with it and that the repair would be warrantied. 

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Five Rabbits

I'll acknowledge the analogy wasn't perfect, most aren't, but most manufcaturers won't honor warranties if you've done after-market modifications that could effect the integrity of the product.  And I fully expect Apple will still void or partially void warranties on iPhones depending on what has been done to them.

But from my understanding this was about whether consumers were even allowed to legaly jailbreak their iPhones.  In the example of your car you were legally allowed modify your clutch assembly; the consequnce, whether fair or not, was it voided warranty associated with the drivetrain.  But you can also still get it repaired else where, just not under warranty.  In any-event you legally had a choice to make the modifications you did, and accept the consequnces that came with it.  I'm assuming you're still allowed to drive your car and enjoying very much.

I suspect Apple's next move will be to suggest allowing jailbroken iPhones some how endangers the security of all the users on their network.  Its hard to get a ruling in your favor because you're trying to protect a person from their own actions (unless its life threatening).  However if you can show another person's actions are effecting others negatively it stands a better chance.

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Bustout

but...

 

What if all you had done was paint your car a different color, maybe even put a car seat cover on because you didn't like the original upholstery, or even changed out your floor mats, and they still refused to honor your warranty because you "Modded" your car?

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Caboose

I hope you got the part repaired. Some mechanics can be real douches. Others will look past the aftermarket parts and replace the factory recalled components.

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bikerbub

that's wrong. may have been you're experience, but unless they can prove that your mod had something to do with the failure, the part is still legally under warranty. 

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Caboose

It'll be interesting to see how this plays out in the long run!

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