Future Tense: 2020 Vision

20

Comments

+ Add a Comment
avatar

Keith E. Whisman

I actually remember those old cameras. I remember going to portrait studios when I was kid with the family and they would bring those cameras to school for school photos. In grade school they took our pics with those cameras and then in junior high and high school they used SLR cameras.

avatar

lunchbox73

Excellent article David. Very interesting.

avatar

timmyw

1.4 gigapixels is already here.

http://pan-starrs.ifa.hawaii.edu/public/design-features/cameras.html

Of course, the consumer-grade cellphone version is still a bit off.

avatar

Free_Willy

Too long; did not read.

avatar

Tekzel

Too bad, your loss. It's a great article. I especially enjoyed the parts about his Dad. I actually got a little melancholy reading it, thinking of all the amazing discoveries I will miss after I'm gone. Of course, I might also miss the zombie apocalypse, so that would be a good thing.

avatar

Biceps

Reading is so difficult, and you know, we usually navigate to journalist and opinion websites about technology because of all the pictures of hot babes - who would expect to have to read anything at maximumpc.com?  I totally understand why you wouldn't want to waste your time reading an article written by an award-winning author, but instead put up an idiotic post and then go watch television or pick your butt.

Don't forget the twinkies.

avatar

Free_Willy

I'm so glad you understand. Also, thank you for taking the time to respond to my idiotic post, it really means a lot to me.

 

They see me trollin'

they hatin'

avatar

Biceps

Can't wait to meet you, m'man!  

avatar

whitneymr

Great story David. This hots close to home with me because I'm a fine art photographer. I started out with a 35mm range finder with no light meter, I got to the point I knew the exposure by hunch.

I stuck with film till digital camera's got to 8.0 meg (Canon 20D) it still wasn't as good as my Canon A2e with Velvia. Then along came the 5D and the end of 35mm. But I will still pull out my 6x6cm on occasion. 

On your thought that sensors will go high in pixel counts I don't think so check out what has said in Digital Photo Pro over this last year. But there will be massive leaps in software, firmware over the next few years that will be jaw dropping and negate the need fore very expensive sensor development. Just look at Sony killing FF sensors this week.

But all in all good job on making me think and have flashbacks.

avatar

Biceps

Thank you for making my day more interesting.

avatar

BlazePC

Always an enjoyable and thought provoking read David.  You're the odd man out on this staff I bet; it's nice to know you're allowed to stay and add some much needed diversity to MPC.  The marketing tainted dribble is starting to grow unbearable as is the cross-linking.

Keep these segments coming Bro...

avatar

David Gerrold

He would not have been the earliest adopter, but he would have been paying attention from the very beginning.  He would have wanted to test the limits of any new technology.  He would also have wanted to make sure it was dependable before he invested his studio in the results.  

I like to think he would have started exploring the possibilities of digital photography with the same camera I did, the Sony 2 megapixel, F-505.  I took some pictures with it that blew up beautifully to 8x10. (Went from there to the F707 and the F828.  My next camera will probably be the Canon EOS 7D.)

My dad enjoyed researching things, testing them, and then finally incorporating them into his work.  I saw him go through the process of testing 35mm cameras before he began using them for regular production work.  But I think he never lost his love of the old 8x10 portrait camera.  He actually had a little yellow bird above the lens so he could say,  "Watch the birdie."

My dad was always interested in new technology.  He may have occasionally been cautious or even skeptical, but he was always curious.  I think he would have loved using a digital camera and Photoshop.  

 

avatar

fiXXer

I'm only involved in photography to the extent of taking pictures of my kids and the occasional random picture of whatever sparks my interest.  I worked at an electronics retail store selling computers, mp3 playes, digital cameras, ect.. and (aside from the PC's) the digital cameras always drew my interest the most.  A large part of that is because I know so little about them.  I have a Cannon PowerShot SX120 IS that I picked up mostly for my wife, but it's pretty much the family camera.  It has a boatload more functionality over our old point-and-shoot, but I'm still interested in the DSLRs and what they can do.

Given how little I actually know about photography, the prospect of holographic photography and video just blows my mind.  To me, the whole 3D craze is a cool gimick when it's done right, but nothing more.  A true, full color holographic image/video would be something spectacular to see first hand.  All I can say about the future, Mr. Gerrold, is that I hope you're right.

avatar

aviaggio

Another highly enjoyable article. I obviously never knew your dad, but do you feel like he would have embraced digital photography, or like so many film purists, shun it? Much like how vinyl audiophiles have shunned the CD?

And please don't take this as an insult, because it put a huge smile on my face, but damn you must be old if that's the kind of photography you remember! I'm no spring chicken but even my grandparents had what was considered at the time to be "point and shoot" cameras. Instants too.

avatar

don2041

Ya and i had to walk 10 miles to school in 3 ft of snow that wasn,t fun

and max pc get rid of that stupid test question below its bad enouph jumping and clicking through or on hoops to download stuff now i have to do it here too i will not comment any more or read your sight untill you remove it

find some other way to stop spam don,t make me suffer!!!!

avatar

aviaggio

Uphill both ways, I assume?

avatar

B10H4Z4RD

Your article's have a tendancy to make me think, which is something that i rarely do. Respect.

The first thing you made me think about was my father, and how much I respect his love for technology and pulling things apart to find how they work. I shant say to much more, I forgot this was the internet.

The second thing you made me think about was the evolution of technology, and the rate that it's evolving, simply put, scares the shit out of me. At what point will the human become unnecesary, and Kianu Reeves is the only one to save us? [Sorry I had to]

Thirdly, why do we need to advance so? Why the 3d movies? why the holograms? besides being badass, what does that do for us?

Lastly, I'm done with thinking.

avatar

Tekzel

Because 3D is the natural evolution of movies. We see our world in 3D. I suspect that once true 3D hits, as David describes (without the glasses), the majority of us will wonder how we ever watched a movie in 2D. Of course, there will be a few luddites crying like babies. The same folk who moan about e-Readers, etc.

avatar

aviaggio

Money. It's all about money. We'd have almost zero technical innovation if there were no dollar signs attached to them.

avatar

bhayes

According to my 1 class of physics in community college most/all new inventions will be a result of the older versions,  so in my calculations, the newest cameras will be a combination of what you now see, hologriphics, combined with x-ray vision (superman style) and the latest lenses that can make out a license plate from an outer space satelite and whammo!! the next few generations of cameras will be able to incorporate all that. But it will take a large large research and development team to put together halographics, xrays, and satalite lenses into a hand help camera. So I see a 10-20 or 30 year wait for this compactness to show in handheld cameras. Excuse the typos by I was just on my way to bed and did not get a chance to look up the correct spelling of halographics and satilite lenses. But I guess the readers will know what I mean.

Log in to MaximumPC directly or log in using Facebook

Forgot your username or password?
Click here for help.

Login with Facebook
Log in using Facebook to share comments and articles easily with your Facebook feed.