AT&T Admits to Intentionally Slowing Down Atrix and HTC Inspire

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nealtse

I'm "excited to announce" that I will drop my service faster then a hot rock if they even think of fracking with my Even More Plus plan, the only honest thing to happen to consumers for cellphones in the last 10 years.  I dream of a landscape where cell companies compete on services, not devices and locked on required service contracts that last longer then the expiration date of plastic.

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jgrimoldy

but... but...  but...

Corporate greed is good for the consumers!

(and other random someone87-brand bullshiat)

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RUSENSITIVESWEETNESS

RIGHT! And this is why we need LESS government regulation! We can ALWAYS trust big business to do what's right!

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someone87

 

Your catching on.... If you noticed the comments, and reactions, people are leaving AT&T, and going somewhere else. So in this instance, AT&T’s greed (if we are calling it that) screwed themselves over. Sprint and Verizon on the other hand, are acting on their greed and offering better plans, better phones, and hoping to draw in all those un-satisfied customers...... The free market will balance itself out, not overnight, not in a week, but in the end, things will work out. It’s up to the consumer to watch out of themselves, and if someone lied, sue them.

It's a proven fact, when the government gets involved, regulates more stuff, prices go up, and service goes down. When a company spends more time complying with government paperwork, inspectors, or whatever else the government demands, costs go up, and products/service goes down to try and offset those costs. Rather in a free market, the consumer takes responsibility for their actions, does their research, and buy something. If what they bought is subpar, shame on them for not researching enough what they bought.

However, if AT&T said the phones would be 4G fast, knowing full well they were crippled, and those speeds would never be obtained. Then sue the living daylights out of them for false advertising, and get out of your contract and go somewhere else. I always have, and always will say the government has no place in regulating private business. But it is the governments job make sure business are honest, and follow the laws we as private citizens do.

I will leave you with one recent example. My wife and I are looking at buying a house in Texas sometime, and I quickly found out that everything in Texas is bigger, and less expensive. A brand new house in Texas (compared to a similar house in Michigan) is close to one third, or one half the price (in the area we were looking, just outside Houston). Coming from a building background, this was very interesting to me. Both houses are made out of the same building materials, both houses has the same floor space (No basements in Texas, so 2 stories compared to a basement and main floor in Michigan), but everything was significantly cheaper. At the end of my trip, I figured out why. Other than connecting your house to the main power grid, there aren’t any, ZERO building codes or inspections required. So on a modest $150,000 dollar house in Michigan, between $50,000 and $60,000 are spent to pull permits, pay for inspections, and comply with all the stupid government regulations applied to the housing/building industry. Yet in Texas, they are able to build *THE EXACT SAME HOUSE* for one third, or one half less. Now I know what you’re thinking….. “That may be true, but the houses in Texas are crap!”. I have been in the building industry half my life, and compared to Michigan homes, they are just as good, if not better than anything you can buy around here. The builders down there do hire Mexicans labor for slightly less money, but the difference is minimal, as skilled labor up here, or down there is very close to the same cost.

My point stands, my house in Michigan isn’t $50,000-$60,00 better because my builder paid the government for permission to pour the foundation, or build walls, or insulate the house, or roof it, or plum/wire it, and have a government official walk though and “approve” the house, and declare it’s ready to live in (called an occupancy permit). None of that makes my roof more water proof, or walls stronger, insulate hold heat better, etc. The exact same house is built in Texas, without all the paperwork/regulations, is way less expensive.

 

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deadsenator

You contradict yourself in your third paragraph:

"the government has no place in regulating private business. But it is the governments job make sure business are honest, and follow the laws"

Sound like regulation to me.  Are you a troll?

Go check the median home prices in Michigan compared to Texas.  Texas is TWICE the price as Michigan ($155k versus $84k).

The price of the home has less to do with inspections or "regulations" and far more to do with the economic environment of the region.  Do your research. 

And guess what?  Building codes are probably coming soon to a rural area near you in Texas.  Especially if you are near the coast.  So, good luck with your home, but bone up on your arbitration clause in case you need to go after your builder.

 

MPC - Hatin' the Publish to Facebook button.

 

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someone87

 

You said,

"You contradict yourself in your third paragraph:”

I said, “the government has no place in regulating private business. But it is the governments job make sure business are honest, and follow the laws"

Regulation, and keeping companies honest are 2 diff things. Regulation is the government saying "You as a private business/company will do this, and that, because we know best, and don’t give a crap." Maintaining the laws of the land are "AT&T said phone X would have 4G speeds". Then we find out "AT&T went out of their way to cripple phone X so it didn't have 4G speeds". That's false advertising and wrong, because they didn't deliver what they promised. The government should hear a class action law suit. That’s the governments roll.

You said,

“Go check the median home prices in Michigan compared to Texas.  Texas is TWICE the price as Michigan ($155k versus $84k).”

I said, “A brand new house in Texas (compared to a similar house in Michigan) is close to one third, or one half the price (in the area we were looking, just outside Houston).”

Again your twisting the facts again. I didn’t say median, I said similar house. There is more money in Texas (oil, building, manufacturing, etc) and less money in Michigan (Detroit houses are worth like $500 on average). So it’s obvious that the *AVERAGE* house in Texas costs more, that doesn’t prove anything.

For the record, I never said you can trust big companies, but rather in the end, with free consumer choice, the customer always wins. You might have to get a new cell phone contact somewhere else, but the less the government regulates, the more consumer wins. 

 

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deadsenator

Regarding keeping businesses honest.  That is regulation, dood.  The degree in which the gub'ment does this is where you seem to have the problem.  You have to admit, not all regulation is bad.

Regarding median home prices.  Median prices prove everything that you were arguing against.  This is how you compare similar houses across the board.  There is no twisting.  You are simply incorrect, that's all.  No shame there.  Take your lumps.

The customer does not always win.  That's why the government sometimes needs to break up monopolies.  Because the consumer is getting the shaft and there are no other choices.  It happens.

 

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Biceps

"Please keep in mind that software is only one of many factors that can affect speeds experienced. Factors such as location, time of day, network capacity, and facilities can have an impact as well."

Another factor that can affect speeds is having a mobile carrier who doesn't give a flying f*ck about their customers. Boo.

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D00dlavy

Sometimes I wonder how stunts like this don't spawn mobs of angry customers and a total bitch-slap from the government, then I remember how lazy Americans are and how bought our government is.

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bling581

If we hit the streets everytime some company screwed us over then you'd be on the street almost 24/7. It's easy for companies to just ignore customers until lawsuits happen or agencies like the BBB are contacted. The government doesn't give a crap. There are few companies left that have any real customer service and we're left to fend for ourselves against those that don't care.

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someuid

"Left unexplained, however, is exactly why AT&T did this."

Because they can and you can't do anything about it.  They want all of your disposable income and know no bounds in getting their hands on it.

The only way to get around this is to dump AT&T and *hope* you'll not get treated so unfairly with Verizon or Sprint.

"We're excited to announce that both the Atrix 4G and Inspire 4G are expected to receive software updates in April."

What a crock of expletive.

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Caboose

So then anyone on a rooted Android handset shouldn't have been affected by this. Unless there was a network filter in place which would throttle the speed when a specific handset is detected.

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screff

Yeah, you can fix it by flashing the radio firmware from some European models of these phones.  It isn't something though that should have to be done in the first place.  AT&T is evil and I hope their merger with TMobile fails.

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Caboose

"It isn't something though that should have to be done in the first place"

I agree. Rogers customers up here had to root their phones so that they'd work with 911 calls until Rogers released a crippled and locked firmware

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