Apricorn Velocity Solo X2 PCIe SSD Adapter Review

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docdj

Fortunately, I did my homework before just inserting and booting. It seems that FIRST, you have to go to Windows and turn on AHCI support, if it wasn't done at Windows install time. If you don't do this, you WILL have to do a CLEAN re-install, because your old drive will be marked as non-bootable and the new one won't boot because there is no system on it yet. Turning on AHCI is a simple registry tweak (HKLM\SYstem\CurrentControlSet\Services\MSahci and set the "Start" key to 0 if it was a 3 or 4). You might also be able (or desire) to set the IAstor "start" key instead for the Intel driver. User comments are mixed on these 2. Then reboot. THEN you can install the Solo + drive and clone your boot drive. You should also be sure your old boot drive is aligned (4K blocks) and defragmented before you clone it to reduce re-writing on the new drive. I have also seen folks say to unplug your OLD boot drive before rebooting the SSD.

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dagoman

The Velocity X2 can do RAID 0 with 800MB/sec

They also make a Velocity X1 that works with PCIe 2.0 x1 slot

More details here:

http://www.apricorn.com/products/desktop-ssd-hdd-upgrade-kits.html

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severnia

PCI-E x2? really??

what board has that? you might get lucky with a handful and find an x4 slot, but most are x1, x8, and x16. I would much rather of had an x1 variant with only one sata port. or, since it has no raid anyway, 2 ports are fine, unless you are transferring between 2 SSD's on this thing, it wouldn't be much of a bottleneck under most real world scenarios. It isnt hard to find a spare X1 slot, and if you have to use a larger lane count slot, so be it. I hate to give up, in the case of most consumers, a larger slot. Poor use of a good chip if you ask me....

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DSS

For some folks replacing the motherboard would also require replacing the CPU and also the memory.

I am in this category. I do not have budget motherboard. I have a DELL Precision 5400 that is beefed up a little. I have Dual Quad Core XEON CPUs with 24GB ECC Fully Buffered memory with a Samsung PRO SSD for a boot drive.

I have tried multiple $20 6GB add-in cards which yielded a performance that was not equal to the on-board SATA II. They identified the drive correctly as a 6GB drive, but none of them could deliver 6GB speed. - None. This is the first one that seems to do so.

$100 is what the recommended sale price for this card and that is direct from the manufacturers website. I found this card at New Egg and also at Amazon for $79 with Free shipping and waiting for it to come in.

For $79 I believe that this will be a great inexpensive and easy upgrade. If you already have a SSD, you just add the card. 10 minute setup. If you would need to clone, it would be a 30 minute upgrade versus a new motherboard, CPU, memory and having to re-install everything all over again.

I was glad to read this review and see that you validated the specs because I had this card ordered prior to reading this.

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vrmlbasic

Wow, I was thinking that machine had to be ancient but it does not seem to be. Another brilliant move by Intel, gimping a powerful CPU with crappy disk access tech. Intel has previously gimped memory (and it looks like they did with your system as well) and they have a long running habit of gimping graphics.

Why does Intel shackle superior parts to inferior tech?

Though I have to admit that I'm wondering why you didn't spring for something like the Revodrive mentioned in the title of the article as even using a $79 adapter to rig a stock SSD in your machine is like using duct tape & expoxy to repair a luxury car.

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DSS

I took a serious look at the RevoDrive. The reviews were not favorable at all. The failure rate in the reviews were just to many. And in almost all instances, all was lost when they failed. The standard SSD drives were much more reliable and if you wanted raw speed from an SSD, then just set it up in RAID 0 and this was the next best thing to RevoDrive at half the cost.

I am just not a fan of RAID 0. If it goes south, it goes south all the way.

Yea my rig is about 4 1/2 years old and the paint is starting to fade. Duct tape will work and if I can set it up with SATA III, I believe that I could get another couple of years more out of it. My weakest point is with the hard drive.

Processor - 7.6
Memory - 7.6
Graphics - 7.4
Gaming Graphics - 7.4
Primary Hard Disk - 7.3

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Damnlogin

For that price you can buy a good budget mobo with SATA 6Gb/s. The idea behind it is good, but it doesn't justify the price. BTW would Acronis True Image do the same cloning task on a SSD?

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roy2115

If your current motherboard is old enough, then a new mobo will most likely not be compatable with your current CPU, meaning more dollars to spend.

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vrmlbasic

Does anyone remember, from years ago, an old overpriced PCI add-in card with a ~500 Mhz processor that was designed to be put into an old PC to give it more power (and make it quasi-multi-processor)? MaximumPC reviewed it way-back-when, so long ago that I believe it was before the Multicore Revolution, but this widget reminded me of it.

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Opm2

Pro Tools once had a card that was a math coprocessor. I do remember physx cards as well.

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vrmlbasic

I'm pretty sure that this was around 2000 or so. It was a PCI card that had some RAM and some sort of ~500 Mhz processor that somehow enabled a bastardized multiprocessor setup in your PC and there was talk of slapping it into old Pentium systems. I wish I could search for it.

BTW, MaximumPC what happened to the cool custom cover art? In looking for this card I saw an old issue talking about Broadband and it had a cover of a cowboy-esque guy riding a coaxial cable as though he were Slim Pickens in Dr. Strangelove.

Ah, the good ole days.

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USraging

ahh... the good old days when my ATI 1950 XTX card was the first to use GDDR4, and crysis was just coming out to destroy my card down to 13FPS.

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goodtime

Why would I buy this when I can get one of these for $20? http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16815124108

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j_j_montez

I was thinking the same thing. I can see it as a bonus, having a place for the SSD, in case all slots are filled in the chassis. But I would pay maybe $40-$50. Cool idea though, just overpriced.

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C--

Would you recommend this product for someone that wants to get faster load times in MMO games but only has SATA II? (He's currently using P6T mobo with Intel i7 920 proc)

P.S. The Apricorn.com link is broken.

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AFDozerman

I normally don't do this, but the 'you're' early in the article should be 'your'.

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joshnorem

Fixed, thanks.

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AFDozerman

No problem. Just figued I'd catch it before the true grammar Nazis showed up. :)

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roy2115

Okay, so how much of a performance boost would I see with my SSD connected to this card instead of my MOBO SATA 3Gb/s port? Or is this card really intended for those people who don't have any SATA ports?

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tom_m

Depends on your SSD's specs. If it can read and write data at 400 MB/s or faster, then a 3Gb/s port will hold it back.

Then again, for $100 you can buy a whole new motherboard that has SATA 6Gb/s ports built in. For example, Google's shopping search shows a new-in-box TZ77XE3 on eBay for that price.

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roy2115

The issue with buying a new mobo is that I would also likely buy a new CPU since my motherboard has a LGA 775 socket. It's probably not a big deal at this point since I've already upgraded most of the rest of my computer...maybe it is time for an Ivy Bridge CPU.

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tom_m

IMO, if you're preparing to upgrade to both a new CPU socket and a new CPU, I'd hold on just a little longer for Haswell (or switch to AMD, whatever floats your boat). Haswell uses the 1150 socket, which is incompatible with Ivy Bridge's 1155 socket. The 1150 socket will presumably also be used for Broadwell, currently scheduled as the successor to Haswell.