Amazon Faces FTC Lawsuit After Rejecting In-App Purchases Settlement

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nick779

Ive always hated 1 click, hopefully this lawsuit will get that to change.

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maxeeemum

Bad... Bad... Amazon .............. BBBAAAAAADDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD!!!

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vrmlbasic

I've long noticed that at Amazon I have to sign into my account explicitly to check my order but so long as my cookie is good I can one-click order anything without having to enter a password.

I was wondering if that design philosophy would burn them in apps, since I noticed that they carried it over, and lo and behold it did.

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Granite

Yep...right in line with our current social way of thought, it's not the child's fault when they fuck up...or the parent's responsibility to deal with the results of that fuck up. It's the victim's (Amazon) fault.

And our liberal-inspired government is here to make sure that the victim pays the price.

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Renegade Knight

Under the law children can't enter into contracts. That's what a credit card transaction is. Legally kids can't have, or use credit cards. If they do, everything can be voided because kids can't enter into contracts.

Amazon (who is making money on the deal which makes them something other than the victim) is merely guilty of being stupid in how they deal with in app purchases because they can have all the charges reversed in them when a kid is the one doing it.

Amazon was already wrong before a parent even entered into the picture. But blaming parents without knowing the facts and how they work is classic current social thinking.

A responsible parent would be perfectly in their rights to tell Amazon to stuff it and have them undo every transaction they allowed a minor to do even as they taught their kids to never do that again as well.

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Granite

Regardless of who uses the card to make a purchase, Amazon is not entering into a contract with a child. They are entering a contract with the holder of the card...an adult.

It is not Amazon's responsibility to ensure that children do not have access to their parent's card. That is the responsibility of the parent.

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The Mac

indeed..

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MrHasselblad

Are a majority of americans:

1. Incapable of anything close to proper parenting skills?
2. So clueless about technology that they allow children to run under administrator settings and also have almost free reign on purchases.

Sounds like typical america anymore; there is zero accountability.

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jason2393

This sounds like a great way to try out all those costly add-ons and upgrades in apps! Just buy the stuff, tell the FTC my kids did it, and they'll make the device manufacturer give me a refund! Brilliant!

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Enigmatistical

The psyche of today's society is baffling. Everyone is being told how special they are so nobody carries any responsibility. Didn't properly teach your children? Right then, blame Amazon.

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Renegade Knight

When parents are in charge of the app store that allows in app purchases without some kind of verification. I will blame them for that.

If I see real evidence that shows how a parent teaches their kid to make dozens of in app purchases, beat the game, then complain to amazon to refund their money. I'll blame the parent for being a freaking parasite on society and teaching their kids to do the same.

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Granite

The only verification Amazon needs to worry about is met when they require a valid card to make a purchase.

If a parent allows their child to use that card, then the parent should be responsible for the charges to it.

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dgrmouse

Wow... you're an outspoken advocate for exploiting children? Do you also shoot any cats that wander into your yard before blaming the owners?

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The Mac

Its not exploitation because a convenience feature of a retail establishment is abused by someone who fails to take responsibility for their actions.

In the case of a child, the parents bear that responsibility.

Enigmatistical is right on the money. Our Society encourages and rewards individuals to shift blame.

Im a lazy drug addict? its my environments fault. Im a criminal theif? its my upbringing. Im a baby factory? its my self-image's fault.

Its absolutely shamefull...

In the case of cats, yes i would if i had a yard. lol. i hate cats.

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Renegade Knight

Fact. Children can't enter into a contract. Businesses who do this anyway can have the contract voided by the child or the parent. Why? Because children can't enter into contracts. A credit card transaction is a contract.

The person who bears the responsibly is actually the business who should know this fundamental tenant of business law.

The other thing that is a simple fact is at the time of the transaction the business was represented and the child was represented. However the parent often isn't. They can be doing something as simple as cooking dinner 4' away and unable to see the screen let alone read it while their kid is being otherwise good.

Business who do enter into contracts with minors have a very simple means to make sure the contract will be good. They tell the kid. "Get your parent over here to sign this."

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The Mac

The phone should be password proected, again the parents fault for leaving the "gun locker" open.

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Carlidan

WTF Mac, just read the article. What the FTC is asking is a reasonable request. The only conclusion I can gather is that Amazon knows it's unethical, but doesn't care, because they are making alot of money doing it.

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wkwilley2

I think it goes more along the lines that Amazon makes it so easy to buy things, especially on the mobile platform with their 1 button checkout option. Even with this said though, it's not Amazon's fault.

If you don't want your kids buying everything off amazon, including apps of the app store, don't leave your account signed in.

Even if they still have access to the store, Amazon sends an email every time you download an app on the appstore, even if it's free, so the parents have no excuse. It's just lazy.

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azuza001

Wait, how is this Amazon s fault? What exactly is the argument here? Is it that Amazon keeps the parents credit card on file so that apps linked to the Amazon store can access it? If that's the case wouldn't that be the apps developers fault for not verifying the person making the purchase is really the owner of the card?

Put another way, say you have a retail store. This stores clerks are paid on commission. so you have some kid come in with their parents card and ask to buy a 1000$ tv. Who's fault is it if that purchase is allowed to go through? The manager of the store because it's his store or the clerk who is actively doing the ringing out and taking of the money? The manager doesn't know that his clerk is doing this, and the clerk benefits from this setup greatly. All the manager can honestly do once the problem is brought to his attention is fire the clerk and offer a refund for the tv back.

I just don't think it should be the app stores responsibility to make sure that developers are being honest with their apps and not marketing them towards kids with in-app purchases that are so simple the kid simply has to press a yes button.

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Renegade Knight

If the app store is handling the money. Then it is their responsibility to ensure that the person using the credit card on file has the right to use it.

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LatiosXT

> If that's the case wouldn't that be the apps developers fault for not verifying the person making the purchase is really the owner of the card?

And how would you go about doing that?

The problem here is, you can either have convenience of not having to enter that information again and all you have to do is accept a confirmation, or protect yourself and have to enter some info every single darn time.

However, the most Amazon can do any way is that, because apparently Android hasn't provided an obvious way of create profiles for different users of the same device.

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azuza001

That's kind of my point, I think they need to remove the convenience factor all together, this isn't any one persons problem or fault it's a combination of contributing factors. kids not understanding + parents with their cc info linked to their Amazon account and not paying attention to what kids are doing + developers making it super easy and convenient to buy "super cool coins" for their micro pay to win transaction games + Amazon keeping easy access to the info for the developer to access. Is Amazon at fault here? Not completely and honestly if any one of the 4 parts had worked right there would be no issue here. I just don't see this as Amazon's problem, not completely.

Also I don't know how Amazon's store works but I have done micro transactions for apps before and they link to my Google play store for payment, do the apps know what store it came from and just go back to that store for additional payment?

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Renegade Knight

Everyone is responsible for their part of the problem.

If my kid can make an in app purchase without a password check. So can a stranger who finds my phone. Thus requiring a password is an amazingly simple precaution. You don't need your buddies ordering King Dong XXX Live and having it shipped by Next Day Air to your office all on your dime either.

A lot of the folks here are blaming parents. Not even awesome parents can watch their kids 24/7. Sometimes you need to cook dinner, change your other kids diaper, sleep, go to work etc. Even the folks blaming parents who on average will be average parents would not be able to helicopter their kids as well as they seem to think other parents should.