Everything You Wanted to Know About SSDs

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atulshah

It would be nice if this article also had the best method to move from HDD to SSD.

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joshnorem

It's outside the scope of what we were trying to cover. In general we tell people to just reinstall their OS and programs, keep their HDD attached for data storage.

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PCLinuxguy

While it was outside of this article's scope, making an article on how to move fro a HDD to SSD would be appreciated as long as it's not limited to only "just re-install everything". That can be an option but isn't the only one for this task.

If however "we tell people to just re-install their OS and programs." is the only method you have then perhaps you need to hand over your power-user cards and hang your heads in shame.

I'm pretty sure Gordon knows how and has done it before since he seems the rather Uber geek and power user of the bunch.

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KLund1

I think a significant issue was missed here.
OCZ makes a blazingly fast SSD that runs off PCI interface, not the SATA III.

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joshnorem

We've tested the OCZ drive and it is decent, but nothing mind-blowing.

http://www.maximumpc.com/article/reviews/ocz_revodrive_x2_240gb_pci_express_ssd_review

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mfcdvm

How soon before SSD's start showing up on PCI cards?

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PCLinuxguy

they already are. Google it :-)

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Blackheart-1220

where can I buy that 256GB SLC SSD?

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joshnorem

I can't find it now :( SLC drives in general though are super, super expensive.

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stige

Corsair has a free utility as well.

works well with my Neutron GTX

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joshnorem

I belive their utility came out after we went to press. I was in contact with them when I was writing this but hadn't seen it when we published. We'll be sure to check it out!

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Innomasta

Pretty sure they mean in big RAID arrays and what not, where drives are bundled and running together in small spaces.

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Gikero

How do hard drive require active cooling? I have seen heatsink + fans that you can attach to keep a drive's temperature down. These are rarely required though. I've also seen some 10K RPM that make the hard drive look like a big heatsink.

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PCLinuxguy

because spinning platters of kinetic motion cause heat as a byproduct.. basic science. do HDDs need it? it depends on the application. Though WD VelociRaptors definitely Need it since it's spinning at 10K rpm. that's alot of heat being made via friction.

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Gikero

Thanks for the reply. I must have been half asleep when I posted the question. I re-read my question, answered it and then saw your reply saying the same thing.

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PCLinuxguy

No worries. we've alld one it at some point. Happy Friday!

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wumpus

I could have sworn I've seen SLC used as a secondary buffer, but that might have been an enterprise level PCI-e based system. If a manufacturer/integrater can source (or more likely fab) a SLC chip (perferably with a wide enough output, this might be why you don't see it, but it may also be the steep profit margin expected on SLC) would really help in fixing most of what plagues SSDs (write multiplies).

I'm pretty sure I have done almost nothing for cooling my hard drives (this might be a problem). Although I suspect that truely fanless operations likely used "green" drives to lower power supply heat levels as much as hard drive heat levels. In cases were you fill even 1U of a rack with hard drives, I'm sure you will need plenty of fans (and for some reason putting them horizontal is the fashion. The moment I needed fans I would want them verticle. Maybe enterprise drives are speced verticle).

"as data is rarely written or read in this fashion." - nitpick: it is read in this fashion plenty. It just is almost always media content that only needs to trickle out at very slow speeds.

"More disturbing is that Trim can be executed at any time—its schedule isn’t transparent to the user—so 10 minutes after you’ve deleted the file, it might already have been purged." - nitpick: this definition of transparant is about as bad as google's [second] definition of literally. Normally "transparent to the user" means the user neither wants nor cares to know about such things, which is typically the case with TRIM.

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MaximumMike

In my opinion, transparent has always meant that it's easily made obvious to the user what the frick is going on. You know - you can see inside, as if you're looking through glass... transparent. Not sure how you've changed the definition to be "something the user ignores," as users can ignore a process whether it is transparent or not. Perhaps you're thinking of inconsequential?

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vrmlbasic

MPC's definition of "transparent" is how I've always seen it employed in the computing world: the user can't "see" what is being performed.

I doubt that "inconsequential" would work.

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wumpus

MPC is claiming transparent==can see. This is true in politics (until you are elected...) but I've always assumed that in computing transparent==can't see (probably need to be root or hardware).

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MaximumMike

When it doesn't matter how something works, it's inconsequential not transparent. When it's easy to see the inner workings of a thing, it's transparent. And MPC's usage in the current article is in line with what I'm saying. I've never noticed them using the word differently. Sorry you guys have been so confused.

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vrmlbasic

MPC's definition of "transparent" is how I've always seen it employed in the computing world: the user can't "see" what is being performed.

I doubt that "inconsequential" would work.

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acidic

the new Samsung evo has a small amount of SLC. that maybe what you were thinking

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joshnorem

You are thinking of the new Sandisk Extreme II. It has a bit of SLC. The Samsung 840 EVO has "simulated" SLC but still uses 3-bit TLC NAND.