3D Showdown: 8 3D Notebooks and Monitors Reviewed

jamor

Seizing on the latest graphics trend, new 3D laptops and monitors arrive en masse. Are they ready to slay their 2D counterparts?

3D is everywhere these days. From new TVs to Hollywood blockbusters to gaming consoles, the technology, which has been around for ages, is now poised to give consumers a more immersive, in-your-face form of entertainment in the home. And the PC is no exception. In fact, it’s a natural fit. The PC games we’ve been playing for years are already rendered with a 3D engine—stereoscopic technology and a suitable set of glasses just bring them to life. Newer games will only optimize that potential. Add to this a spate of Blu-ray 3D movies coming down the pike and you can see why the PC is well within the clutches of this latest trend.

Sure enough, a cadre of new 3D laptops and monitors make it possible for you to enjoy stereoscopic content both on your desktop and on the go. The vast majority of these offerings rely on Nvidia’s 3D Vision kit—a set of powered shutter glasses, a USB-connected IR emitter, and the appropriate drivers—which, when paired with the right GPU (a GeForce 8 series or newer) and a 120Hz screen, provide an “active” 3D experience. In other words, as a rapid succession of alternating screens presents slightly different views to each eye, the shutter glasses ensure that the correct view is seen by the correct eye by shuttering the opposite lens accordingly.

Passive solutions for the PC also exist. These rely on polarized screens and glasses, which help resolve a double set of images shot from slightly different angles by filtering out one image for each eye and thus creating the illusion of depth.

Besides these major distinctions, there are several other points to consider before investing in a 3D experience for your PC. Our reviews of several new 3D laptops and monitors will help educate you on what’s out there and what kind of features to look for to meet your 3D needs.

3D Laptop Reviews

Origin EON15-3D

For folks who have no interest in 3D movies

Newcomer Origin made an impressive debut with its Genesis desktop system in our August issue, so we were anxious to see what it could do with a 3D gaming laptop.

We received the company’s very first 3D model—the unit it demoed at this year’s E3 gaming expo. In that context, the choice of hardware makes a lot of sense. This 15.6-inch EON15-3D sports a GeForce GTX 285M—arguably the burliest mobile graphics card available. Certainly better than the GTX 260M in our zero-point rig and quite capable of hitting a playable frame rate on a 1680x1050 external display (up from the unit’s native 1366x768) with lots of visual effects enabled—in non-3D conditions, that is.

To achieve 3D, the EON15-3D uses Nvidia’s 3D Vision kit. The laptop comes with the requisite emitter, shutter glasses, and 120Hz screen. Enabling 3D is simply a matter of entering the Nvidia Control Panel, selecting Enable Stereoscopic 3D, and completing a straightforward setup wizard.


Gamers will appreciate the EON15-3D's GeForce GTX 285M.

While Nvidia’s list of 3D Vision–worthy games is vast, some games are more worthy than others. Both of our gaming benchmarks, for example, are noted as having “Excellent” 3D Vision support. But while the 3D effects in Call of Duty 4 and Far Cry 2 are certainly noticeable, we weren’t particularly captivated by the experience. Newer games developed with 3D Vision in mind—Just Cause 2 and Mafia II being two prime examples—make for a more compelling experience.

You’ll want the experience to be special, because 3D carries a performance hit. After all, stereoscopy requires that twice as many screens are generated, one for each eye. With 3D enabled, we saw our Call of Duty frame rate drop from 68.87 at a res of 1680x1050 to 39.1 at 1366x768. We wanted to test the laptop with one of the large 3D panels we’re also reviewing in this story—the EON15-3D is the only laptop that has the necessary dual-link DVI-out (which could also come in handy for a 30-inch display). Unfortunately, the port would only output at single-link throughput—a snafu Origin attributes to the earliness of our build. We did, however, verify that the laptop could display 3D content using a 120Hz 3D projector via HDMI.

That would be a great way to display Blu-ray 3D movies, if only the EON15-3D supported them. While the GTX 285M provided some of the strongest gaming numbers in this roundup, the card is not compatible with Blu-ray 3D playback (Origin also offers a Blu-ray 3D–compatible GTS 360M option). You can still play regular Blu-ray movies on the laptop’s BD-ROM/DVD combo drive.

The EON15-3D’s other attributes include a quad-core Core i7 proc, a 500GB Seagate Momentus XT hybrid drive, and 4GB of DDR3/1333 RAM. Physically, the machine is surprisingly unadorned for a gaming rig, but the matte-black body is solid with a big keyboard, full number pad, and a lots of connectivity options.

Is it worth a whopping $2,600? Not when there are less-expensive options that make fewer compromises.

Specifications
CPU
1.73GHz Intel Core i7-820QM
RAM
4GB DDR3/1333
Chipset
Intel PM55
GPU
Nvidia GeForce GTX 285M
Hard Drive
Seagate Momentus XT 500GB HDD (7,200rpm) / SSD hybrid
Optical
LG BD ROM/DVD burner
Connectivity
DL DVD-D, HDMI, Ethernet, modem, four USB 2.0, eSATA, media reader, webcam, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, headphone, mic, line in, digital S/PDIF
Lap/Carry
9 lbs, 11.2 oz / 7 lbs, 12.7 oz

Vista 64-bit Benchmarks

Zero Point

Premiere Pro CS3 (sec)
1,320
900
Photoshop CS3 (sec)
153
146
ProShow Producer (sec)
1,524
866
MainConcept (sec)
2,695
1,732
Far Cry 2 (fps)
32.7
37.5
Call of Duty 4 (fps)
58.2
68.9
Battery Life (min)
100
49 (-51%)

Our zero-point notebook is an iBuypower M865TU with a 3.06GHz Core 2 Duo T9900, 4GB DDR3/1066 RAM, a 500GB Seagate hard drive, a GeForce GTX 260M, and Windows Vista Home Premium 64-bit. Far Cry 2 tested at 1680x1050 with 4x AA; Call of Duty 4 tested at 1680x1050 with 4x AA and anisotropic filtering.

The Origin EON15-3D Verdict
3D

Quad-core proc; fastest mobile GPU available; Dual-Link DVI port.

VD

Incompatible with Blu-ray 3D; expensive; abysmal battery life.

Toshiba Satellite A665-3DV

Covers almost all the bases

Toshiba’s Satellite A665-3DV presents an interesting juxtaposition to Origin’s machine—for one thing, it costs $1,000 less. Like Origin’s EON15-3D, the A665-3DV features a 15.6-inch, 1366x768, 120Hz glossy screen, and uses Nvidia’s 3D Vision kit.

This machine, like Origin’s, also comes with a 1.73GHz Intel Core i7-740QM quad-core processor, which makes for strong performance in all of our content-creation benchmarks. The A665-3DV has a bigger hard drive than the Origin rig (640GB vs. 500GB), but it’s slower (5,400rpm vs. 7,200rpm), which could account for the latter’s lead in productivity apps. A more significant difference between the two machines, however, is the A665-3DV’s use of a GeForce GTS 350M for graphics chores. While this is considered an enthusiast GPU, its scores in Far Cry 2 and Call of Duty 4 were 33 percent and 42 percent lower, respectively, than those of the Origin’s GTX 258M. Indeed, at our standard gaming benchmark settings, using 4x AA and anisotropic filtering and running at 1680x1050 on an external display, the GTS 350M reached just barely playable frame rates.


The optical drive in the A665-3DV reads and writes Blu-ray discs.

Obviously, this didn’t bode well for 3D game performance. We saw CoD 4 drop to 24.5fps at the notebook’s 1366x768 native res. Yes, you can improve matters by lowering settings—in FC2, for example, we could reach 31.2fps at 1366x768 by turning all the quality settings to low. Lowering the resolution could also provide a boost. But we found ourselves questioning whether the enhanced realism and immersiveness that 3D promises isn’t offset by diminishing all graphical details.

One thing the GTS 350M has going for it is the ability to play Blu-ray 3D movies. And a nice perk of Toshiba’s A665-3DV is that it comes bundled with Corel WinDVD for Blu-ray 3D—none of the other notebooks here include a Blu-ray 3D player, meaning you have to shell out another hundy for the privilege. If watching 3D movies on a small laptop screen doesn’t float your boat, an HDMI port lets you connect to a 120Hz 3D projector.

The A665-3DV is notable in a couple other respects. It’s the only rig in this roundup that offers BD burning as well as reading through its optical drive. And its 12-cell battery actually makes it viable to use away from a power outlet. Quad-core and discrete GPU notwithstanding, the laptop played a DVD in power-saving mode for more than two hours before losing juice. And still, the laptop had the second-lightest weight of the bunch.

Aesthetically, the A665-3DV is only slightly more ornate than the Origin EON15-3D—it’s all-black finish is spruced up some with texture on the laptop’s lid and around the keyboard, which itself is underlit by blue LEDs.

Were it not for the compromises inherent to playing 3D games on mobile-graphics power, we’d say the A665-3DV is a pretty good deal.

Specifications
CPU
1.73GHz Intel Core i7-740QM
RAM
4GB DDR3/1066
Chipset
Intel HM55
GPU
Nvidia GeForce GTS 350M
Hard Drive
Toshiba 640GB HDD (5,400rpm)
Optical
Matshita BD/DVD burner
Connectivity
VGA, HDMI, Ethernet, three USB 2.0, one USB 2.0/eSATA, headphone, mic, ExpressCard/34, webcam, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth
Lap/Carry
8 lbs, 2.1 oz / 6 lbs, 11.7 oz

Vista 64-bit Benchmarks

Zero Point

Premiere Pro CS3 (sec)
1,320
900
Photoshop CS3 (sec)
153
148
ProShow Producer (sec)
1,524
990
MainConcept (sec)
2,695
1,933
Far Cry 2 (fps)
32.7
25.1 (-23.2%)
Call of Duty 4 (fps)
58.2
39.4 (-51%)
Battery Life (min)
100
155

Our zero-point notebook is an iBuypower M865TU with a 3.06GHz Core 2 Duo T9900, 4GB DDR3/1066 RAM, a 500GB Seagate hard drive, a GeForce GTX 260M, and Windows Vista Home Premium 64-bit. Far Cry 2 tested at 1680x1050 with 4x AA; Call of Duty 4 tested at 1680x1050 with 4x AA and anisotropic filtering.

The Toshiba Satellite A665-3DV Verdict
Immersion

Quad-core proc; includes Blu-ray 3D player; write BD discs; 12-cell battery.

Perversion

Performance hobbled in 3D games.

Next Page: 3D Laptop Reviews continued »

Asus G51Jx 3DE

Revisions to first attempt pay off

The G51Jx 3DE is Asus’s second iteration of a 3D Vision–based laptop, following last year’s G51J 3D. In that time, the company has taken the noteworthy step of building the necessary IR emitter for the shutter glasses into the laptop itself. This means you have one less thing hanging off of your machine or needing to be packed up for transport. It also mitigates any worries about the position of the external emitter, which, when turned at the wrong angle, can cause the glasses to shut off or act wonky. It’s a big improvement to the overall experience and we commend Asus for the move.

The 15.6-inch notebook is primarily black, but a two-toned blue cover with a “claw-mark” motif reveals a gamer bias. The inside is understated but attractive, with a backlit keyboard that can be turned on or off, a comfy soft-touch palm rest, and a full-size island keyboard and number pad.


With the G51Jx 3DE you don't need an external IR emitter for 3D because it's built into the laptop.

Like the other laptops here, the G51Jx 3DE features a quad-core CPU—a 1.60GHz Intel Core i7-720QM, in this case. That makes it slightly slower than the 1.73GHz Origin and Toshiba rigs, but the G51Jx 3DE still posted respectable numbers in the productivity benchmarks. And while Asus wisely chose a GPU that can play Blu-ray 3D movies, it went with the highest-end mobile part in that category, the GTS 360M. This part improves upon the GTS 350M in Toshiba’s machine with faster GPU, memory, and shader clocks, resulting in a marked improvement in gaming. In fact, the GTS 360M bested even the GTX 285M in Far Cry 2 by 20 percent, although it lagged behind Origin’s card in Call of Duty 4, with a score of 51.6fps. Still, the 360M provides at least a little more wiggle room when it comes to balancing performance and visual effects when 3D is enabled—while also supporting BD 3D.

The G51Jx 3DE comes bundled with CyberLink PowerDVD 9 for Blu-ray playback, but no software to support Blu-ray 3D. We tried using the latest release of CyberLink PowerDVD 10 Mark II to play a 3D movie, but we would barely get past the menu before a blank, flickering screen took over. CyberLink said this was due to a conflict with the latest graphics drivers which would be fixed with an upcoming patch. To us, it was just another reminder of the hassles that sadly accompany new technology. Fortunately, a prerelease build of WinDVD 3D did the job, treating us to the 3D version of Monsters vs. Aliens on the laptop’s screen as well as through our 120Hz projector using the laptop’s HDMI.

There’s room for improvement here, but the G51Jx 3DE streamlines the 3D Vision experience and offers the best combination of 3D gaming and movie playback of all the notebooks here.

Specifications
CPU
1.60GHz Intel Core i7-720QM
RAM
6GB DDR3/1066 dual
Chipset
Intel HM55
GPU
Nvidia GeForce GTS 360M
Hard Drive
Seagate 500GB HDD (7,200rpm)
Optical
LG BD ROM/DVD burner
Connectivity
VGA, HDMI, four USB 2.0, eSATA, FireWire, Ethernet, mic, headphone, 8-in-1 media reader
Lap/Carry
9 lbs, 3.4 oz / 7 lbs, 11 oz

Vista 64-bit Benchmarks

Zero Point

Premiere Pro CS3 (sec)
1,320
1,080
Photoshop CS3 (sec)
153
141.6
ProShow Producer (sec)
1,524
1,070
MainConcept (sec)
2,695
2,103
Far Cry 2 (fps)
32.7
45.2
Call of Duty 4 (fps)
58.2
51.6 (-11.3%)
Battery Life (min)
100
67 (-33%)

Our zero-point notebook is an iBuypower M865TU with a 3.06GHz Core 2 Duo T9900, 4GB DDR3/1066 RAM, a 500GB Seagate hard drive, a GeForce GTX 260M, and Windows Vista Home Premium 64-bit. Far Cry 2 tested at 1680x1050 with 4x AA; Call of Duty 4 tested at 1680x1050 with 4x AA and anisotropic filtering.

The Asus G51Jx 3DE Verdict
Dimension

Quad-core proc; GPU supports 3D games and Blu-ray; built-in IR emitter.

Dementia

3D gaming requires graphical sacrifice; no Blu-ray 3D software.

Lenovo IdeaPad Y560d

A passive alternative to 3D Vision

Lenovo breaks from the pack with its IdeaPad Y560d, eschewing Nvidia’s 3D Vision kit in favor of a passive 3D solution. Thus, the IdeaPad Y560d’s 15.6-inch, 1366x768 screen is polarized and capable of displaying two different perspectives of an image, which become a single 3D image when viewed through a pair of polarized glasses. The laptop comes with a fairly robust pair as well as a set of clip-on lenses to wear over prescription specs.

The hardware works in conjunction with TriDef 3D software. A single setup screen presents you with a stereoscopic image. With the glasses on, you follow the prompts for adjusting the angle of the screen and your orientation to it­—when done right, the image appears 3D. The effect is every bit as vivid as the one you get from a 3D Vision–based system, and the polarized glasses are more comfortable than the bulky powered shutter glasses and never need to be charged. The trouble is, there are serious trade-offs.


The Y560d is the flashiest of the bunch, with a large tribal design on its lid and orange trim around the screen.

For one thing, you have to remain fairly fixed in that 3D-viewing sweet spot. If you move your head or the angle of the screen just so, the image loses focus. Another drawback is that neither the hardware nor software supports Blu-ray 3D playback. In fact, the IdeaPad Y560d doesn’t even come with a BD-ROM drive. You can watch 3D movies using TriDef, but you’re limited to videos in an open format, such as .avi, .mpg, and .mov. Lenovo includes some sample clips and trailers, and they certainly look impressive—but that’s hardly a substitute for Blu-ray 3D blockbusters. As a consolation, TriDef will convert your standard-def DVDs to a 3D format, but that’s a pretty weak substitute itself.

Game options are more plentiful. The TriDef app will automatically identify any games on your system that are 3D-capable—most modern games apply. By launching the game from within the TriDef app, the content is rendered in stereoscopy for 3D enjoyment with your polarized glasses. The same caveats about performance stand. While the Y560d’s method for 3D is passive, it still requires twice the number of screens as 2D content and therefore presents a performance drag. Call of Duty 4 dropped from 37.1fps on a 1680x1050 external screen to 21.3fps on the Y560d’s 1366x768 screen when 3D was enabled.

Aside from its 3D implementation, the Y560d is similarly configured to the other laptops here, sporting a quad-core processor, a 500GB, 7,200rpm hard drive, and 4GB of DDR3/1333 RAM. Its Radeon HD 5730 videocard is a mixed bag, doing slightly better than our zero-point in FC2 (without 3D, natch), but significantly worse in Call of Duty 4.

This isn’t the laptop to buy if you’re looking for a full-fledged 3D experience, which to us means 3D Blu-ray movies and the ability to watch them on a large external screen, not to mention an experience that doesn’t limit you to a narrow viewing angle. But the Y560d is priced right if you want a well-rounded 15.6-inch laptop that offers a (relatively) inexpensive way to tinker with the occasional 3D game.

Specifications
CPU
1.60GHz Intel Core i7-720QM
RAM
4GB DDR3/1333 dual-channel
Chipset
Intel HM55
GPU
ATI Mobility Radeon HD 5730
Hard Drive
Hitachi 500GB 7,200rpm HDD
Optical
Slimtype DVD burner
Connectivity
VGA, HDMI, three USB 2.0, one USB 2.0/eSATA, Ethernet, headphone, mic, webcam, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth
Lap/Carry
7 lbs, 9.6 oz / 6 lbs, 2.6 oz

Vista 64-bit Benchmarks

Zero Point

Premiere Pro CS3 (sec)
1,320
960
Photoshop CS3 (sec)
153
153.3 (-.2%)
ProShow Producer (sec)
1,524
986
MainConcept (sec)
2,695
2,032
Far Cry 2 (fps)
32.7
34.2
Call of Duty 4 (fps)
58.2
37.1 (-36.2%)
Battery Life (min)
100
108

Our zero-point notebook is an iBuypower M865TU with a 3.06GHz Core 2 Duo T9900, 4GB DDR3/1066 RAM, a 500GB Seagate hard drive, a GeForce GTX 260M, and Windows Vista Home Premium 64-bit. Far Cry 2 tested at 1680x1050 with 4x AA; Call of Duty 4 tested at 1680x1050 with 4x AA and anisotropic filtering.

The Lenovo IdeaPad Y560d Verdict
Stereoscopy

Quad-core proc; convincing 3D effects; relatively inexpensive.

Endoscopy

No Blu-ray 3D support; no BD-ROM; games in 3D take a performance hit.

Next Page: 3D Monitors Reviewed »

3D Monitor Reviews

Asus VG236H

Everything you need for 3D

The Asus VG236H is one of two panels we tested that utilize Nvidia’s 3D Vision technology, but the only one that comes with Nvidia’s 3D Vision kit (active 3D shutter glasses, IR emitter, and drivers), which is a nice inclusion as the kit itself runs about $180. The 23-inch monitor runs in standard 1920x1080 widescreen at 120Hz and has dual-link DVI, HDMI, and component inputs. While the monitor will move up and down for height adjustment, and tilt forward and back, it does not swivel from left to right.


Colors pop nicely on the VG236H, but the glossy screen also produces plenty of reflections.

The VG236H’s glossy screen features something Asus calls “Color Shine Technology,” which certainly makes colors pop, but the “Anti-reflection Glare Panel” could use some work—like most glossy screens, this one revealed plenty of reflection. Likewise, we thought the onscreen menu navigation could use some improvement; it was hard to find a way to exit out of options and the menu visibility was occasionally so light it was difficult to read (during movie viewing). While the monitor scored well in our DisplayMate ( www.displaymate.com ) tests, it did reveal some detail loss in the black-level test—an issue we saw recreated in some of the predominantly dark scenes in V for Vendetta—as well as some issues in the internal reflections test, showing halos around the white boxes. Overall, however, the monitor performed admirably and rendered 3D flawlessly during our game tests.

Specifications
Viewable Area
23 inches
Native Resolution
1920x1080
Panel Type
TN
Inputs
DVI, HDMI, Component

The Asus VG236H Verdict
Stealth Bomber

Packaged with Nvidia's 3D Vision Kit, 3D performs without so much as a hiccup.

Moped

Menu button navigation was frustrating, no left to right movement and no USB ports.

Alienware OptX AW2310t

An opaque contender

Alienware’s OptX AW2310t also uses Nvidia’s active 3D Vision kit—however, it has to be purchased separately. Much like Asus’s monitor, the OptX AW2310t is a 23-inch widescreen, 1920x1080, TN monitor. It includes HDMI and DVI ports. It also features four USB ports (which are a lot more accessible if you don’t use the included cable cover), and you can adjust the screen’s height, swivel, and tilt to suit your preference. It also differentiates itself from the Asus by having a matte screen—which doesn’t produce colors quite as vividly as the Asus but it also doesn’t produce any distracting reflections.


The OptX AW2310t was the only matte screen we tested, and it earns points for its ability to swivel, tilt, and turn.

The AW2310t’s menu buttons are neatly located on the side bezel and easy to navigate. We like that there is an option to personalize shortcut buttons. The monitor performed consistently through our DisplayMate tests—beating out the Asus in the internal reflections test and holding its own in the color and intensity tests. It also did well with text, down to 6.8 points, although it did occasionally appear a bit grainy in grayscales. While playing Batman: Arkham Asylum in 3D, we noticed some ghosting around background objects, but didn’t see any other signs of strain. If you’re looking for a well-designed 3D monitor—with an anti-glare screen—this one should serve you well. That is, as long as you have the extra cash for the 3D Vision kit.

Specifications
Viewable Area
23 inches
Native Resolution
1920x1080
Panel Type
TN
Inputs
DVI, HDMI, four USB ports

The Alienware OptX AW2310t Verdict
Hans Solo

Monitor moves and swivels in any direction easily, 4 USB ports

Jar Jar Binks

Nvidia's 3D Vision Kit sold separately, some ghosting during 3D gaming

Zalman ZM-M240W

A monitor only a masochist could love

The 24-inch Zalman ZM-M240W distinguishes itself right out of the gate by using passive 3D technology on a 60Hz monitor. Zalman uses iZ3D Stereoscopic drivers to power the TN panel, and includes a set of rather flimsy glasses as well as an additional clip-on set for users who wear corrective glasses. The monitor itself will tilt but does not turn from left to right or adjust for height. But that was the least of our concerns.


A problem child from start to finish, the ZM-M240W was the only monitor we tested that featured passive 3D technology.

From the start, setup issues plagued us—we had difficulty with the iZ3D software, which was confusing to navigate and thoroughly unhelpful, as well as the Zalman Stereoscopic player, which doesn’t work with Blu-ray 3D movies. Yes, that’s right: This $650 (with software) monitor does not play Blu-ray 3D movies. Zalman says it’s looking into enabling it to do so, but has primarily designed the monitor for 3D gaming.

Unfortunately, its performance during our gaming tests was poor. Bright whites bled out all details, and despite Zalman’s reported 5ms response time, we saw plenty of ghosting and double images. This was partially because changing the viewing angle even slightly resulted in a loss of 3D effect. DisplayMate tests and regular DVD viewing revealed light leakage along the top and bottom of the monitor, jagged lines in close-up photos, trouble with grayscales and black-and-white saturation tests, and difficulty with color registration. The glossy screen blundered through the internal reflections test and displayed a curious white line framing the display. Zalman’s included 3D clips were nearly unwatchable due to stuttering and freezing. Overall, a disappointing and frustrating experience.

Specifications
Viewable Area
23 inches
Native Resolution
1920x1080
Panel Type
TN
Inputs
DVI, VGA

The Zalman ZM-M240W Verdict
Jay-Z

Two sets of glasses included

Jar Jar Binks

Near impossible to set up, doesn't play Blu-ray 3D, High price point, Small on-access view point

How to Run 3D across Three Monitors

Nvidia’s 3D Vision kit will support a triple-monitor setup, provided all three monitors are 120Hz panels of the same make and model and you are running a GeForce GTX 460 or higher in two-way SLI or a GTX 260 in three-way SLI. Here’s how you set it up.

First, head over to the Nvidia Control Panel and select Configure SLI, PhysX, Surround. In the newly opened tab, click Span Displays w/Surround and hit Configure. Every distinct three-panel setup requires a different set of GPU plugin configurations. In our setup, we were running three GTX 480s in SLI, but your plugin configurations will depend on your GPUs (and remember, in order to do this, you’ve got to have at least two GPUs running in SLI).

Once you’ve selected your plugin configurations, we recommend restarting your computer (when we didn’t, our computer had difficulty picking up on all three monitors). Once the Nvidia Control Panel identifies all three panels, you’re ready to continue.

Next, you’ll be asked to arrange your displays, which is easy enough. Hit the identify button to see numbers displayed across all three of your panels, then drag the numbered icons to match the numbers on your display.

The next screen will give you the option to adjust for the monitors’s bezels. This is a relatively simple task that we actually found quite helpful. The bezel correction image is a picture of a road that stretches between two monitors. You’ll notice that the road is fragmented between each panel, so simply raise or lower your surround panels until the road appears straight.

Once your three monitors have been configured, load up your favorite game, crank the resolution up to 5760x1080, and you’re ready to bask in the glory of three-panel 3D gaming.

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